golden laced Wyandotte roo or pullet?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by hannah78, Jul 1, 2015.

  1. hannah78

    hannah78 In the Brooder

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    12 weeks old pullet or roo?
    Please let me know.
    im suspecting his tail feather looks like a roo and hackel feathers as well.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2015
  2. hannah78

    hannah78 In the Brooder

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    more pics of it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2015
  3. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Crowing

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    At 12 weeks I don't see anything screaming rooster. It looks like a pullet to me. :eek:)
     
  4. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Crowing

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    Looks like a nice pullet developing. :D

    LofMc
     
  5. hannah78

    hannah78 In the Brooder

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    How can I find out? I have a mixed baby roo and looks just same to me.. ^-^...have no idea..
    There are so many things to learn.
     
  6. hannah78

    hannah78 In the Brooder

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    Did u find out with comb??its comb looks different from others.. have no idea.. but thank you for your advice.. hope its a hen. Already have two handsome roos ^-^
    I heard pullets tail feather supposed to be round and broad but it doesnt look like it to me. Well so confused. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2015
  7. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Crowing

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    I look first at the comb.

    In Wyandottes (as most breeds), the males will get fleshier, redder combs long before the girls do. Girls combs can get peachy (in this breed) but only get red and fleshy just before point of lay, but the roosters will get hen sized combs generally by 12 weeks of age, with growth obvious weeks earlier (around 4 to 6), then come to full glory by 4 to 6 months. (Wyandottes take a little longer to mature than the commercial hybrids...closer to 5 to 6 months for full maturity).

    Then, with GLW, you look at pattern. The females have the pretty even lacing. The males have a more blocky pattern. Look at photos of male vs. female adult GLW to see what I mean.

    You then look at the chicks to see how things are lining up. Early, pink/red comb that is fleshy...roo. Pale comb, maybe peach, not much flesh, pulelt.

    Even pattern, pullet. Blocky colors...probably roo (but you have to give them time to grow in feathers and go through juvenile molts which makes all of them look pretty silly at times).

    I don't go by behavior so much nor leg sizes, although that can help, as I've had ladies with amazon legs and who have been very snotty, chest bumping the others...roo's just tend to do it more. Roo's can stand upright more, but I've also had dominant pullets do that. You won't see the true strutting until sexual maturity in the guys, although some get rather plucky (always funny when momma puts them in their place).

    Then of course the secondary sex feathers for the fellas will begin around 12 to 16 weeks (sometimes not finishing until 20 weeks) with saddle feathers and sickle tails....then the crowing.

    Ladies grow more gracefully, soft round feathers, rounder form, wider hips (for egg laying)...they take a growth spurt with combs reddening and wattle plumping and hips widening just before their first egg. (You can actually tell who is laying and who is not by the distance between their pelvic bones and keel...narrow/not...wide/laying). You'll know they are close to laying when you see those signs and they begin to egg squat when you come near them (position for mating) and take forever in the nest box, in and out, in and out. That first egg is quite the trauma for some of them.

    All signs of who's who in the coop.

    LofMc
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2015
  8. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Crowing

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    X2 on LofMc's reply. Outside of sex linked hybrids and auto sexing breeds, both of which can be sexed by color from hatching, comb size and redness is the first indicator of whether or not a bird is a cockerel or a pullet.
     

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