Goose Aggression

Discussion in 'Geese' started by pomnovice, Mar 31, 2017.

  1. pomnovice

    pomnovice Out Of The Brooder

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    I've heard multiple times that geese are very prone to being aggressive, and mine have left scratches up to five or six inches. I've had them as four or five day olds since February 15th, therefore they're still relatively young, about two months. I've heard about techniques to calm them, but I was wondering if handling gloves or boots may prevent injuries? My gander Cassius is sweet enough and cuddles me, but I heard that makes them aggressive, therefore I'd like to be prepared.
     
  2. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

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    How are they causing the scratches? Pomeranians aren't known as a very agressive breed; they tend to be on the calmer and more docile side. Geese aren't always aggressive like people say. I have four myself and not one of them has ever been aggressive with me, not even the gander. The worst I ever get is my most skittish female hissing at me from time to time.
     
  3. pomnovice

    pomnovice Out Of The Brooder

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    I own both Pomeranians and Roman Tufted. Yes, the Pomeranians are much more docile, but when I've needed to transport them or clean a wound, they've dug their nails into my arm and drug them down. I don't think it's purposefully, though it's a concern for when they're older.
     
  4. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

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    No, that's them being afraid or not wanting to be held and struggling trying to get down, it's not what I would call aggression. In those situations yes wearing long sleeves and long pants and gloves etc would prevent them from scratching you.

    My Tufted Romans are very sweet and docile. They'd still do the same thing if I tried to pick them up and handle them because it scares them and they don't like it. Even my most friendly female who was imprinted on me and raised alone as a gosling still does this. So don't take it personally or as a sign of future aggression, it's just not natural to them to be picked up and held and they don't like and they'll struggle to try to get away.
     
  5. pomnovice

    pomnovice Out Of The Brooder

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    I haven't taken it personally at all. When I do have to move them, which I try not to do often, I try to cause them the least amount of stress possible and to soothe them until they're calm before I do anything. Thank you for responding, though. I know they're prey animals and they do get stressed, I just hope I can find a way that won't scare them as much.
     
  6. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

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    I hope you weren't taking my responses as being disapproving, because they definitely weren't. It's hard to convey tone through text. There are certainly times that they have to be handled for their own good and I wasn't trying to say you shouldn't do it. I was just trying to let you know it wasn't aggression, but rather them trying to get away.
     

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