Goose attacked by dog

Discussion in 'Geese' started by greyfields, Oct 30, 2007.

  1. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 15, 2007
    Washington State
    Well I had my first dog attack one of my geese. I have 30-something geese that wander around the farmhouse here. My weekend neighbor has a Portugese Water Dog who has a strong prey drive. He is very concientious of this and the dog is always leashed. He was loading him into the crate in his truck, getting ready to leave, and the dog got loose and ran a goose down. Fortunately, he was right on it so the damage could have been worse.

    So, I got another neighbor to come down who is a better vet than I am. We stitched up the wounds, the largest being about a 3" long gash by 4" wide. There were 3 pretty deep punctures into the muscle on the back which caused the skin to rip. In general, geese have very thin skin, so stitching it was not easy. We drenched the wound repeatedly with a penecillin/water mixture and we're giving the goose IM penecilling daily for probably a week. We covered the wound with pink-coat.

    So far, so good. The goose has not managed to pick any of the stitches out or really fuss at the wound at all. We have her locked in the laundry room bathroom. She's alert, up and wanting to move. But the bathroom is small, intentionally, so we have her somewhere that she cannot spread her wings (the wound is right down the backbone). Her flock is standing outside the bathroom window calling into her and she's shouting back. So she has a lot of spirit; but we're not letting her out for many more days yet.

    Everything I've read says geese are amazingly resistant to infection. But dog bites are notoriously bacteria filled. We'll see which wins. If she pulls through, she'll be named "Lucky". She is a crossbreed that was intended to be a Christmas goose on November 13th.... but there is no way we can sell her now since the wounds won't heal and she'll be scarred.

    This is the second time I've had a goose go into shock. We have an AGA in the kitchen, which has saved a lot of animals' lives. So if you have a goose go into shock, bundle them in a blanket somewhere warm. I sat this one on my lap for several hours stroking her under the chin which kept her calm. Then, just make sure they drink water if they want to. You can tell when a goose is in shock because their eyes seem glazed over and they seem to hunch over with their beaks on the floor. Once they come out of it, you will notice them get far more alert with their heads and eyes.
     
  2. picklespickles

    picklespickles Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 27, 2007
    what is an aga?

    i'm sorry about your goose. that sounds terrible.
     
  3. hatchcrazzzy

    hatchcrazzzy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 8, 2007
    kemp texas
    how is your goose doing
     
  4. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    The gashes are scabbed over. She refuses to be hindered by it. When her flock flies off, she's there chasing them with her one good wing flapping, skipping across the ground. We're catching her every other night and giving her penecilling and reapplying the red kote (like blue kote, but red). I think she's going to make it. The wounds are swollen and she is fussing at them a bit... but generally no sign of extreme infection. I'll let Lucky know she has some fans. [​IMG]
     
  5. hatchcrazzzy

    hatchcrazzzy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 8, 2007
    kemp texas
    great hope she get well
     
  6. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    This has been reinforcing that geese are my favorite animals on the farm.
     
  7. DrakeMaiden

    DrakeMaiden Overrun with Drakes

    Jun 8, 2007
    Kitsap County, WA
    Hi, I don't know how I missed this post last week, but I'm sorry your neighbor's dog attacked your goose. I'm glad she's doing well.

    Just this past weekend we had a lynx sneak up and snatch one of our ducks. This was our first predator that has scored so far, since we moved here this past summer. My husband had just let them out of their night quarters to let them free-range and he heard the commotion and ran after the thief. Luckily the bird got dropped and she flew back to the pond, but she had a bleeding puncture wound. I spent the weekend attending to her wound and administering antibiotic -- but couldn't find any information on the proper dilution for ducks. I suspect she was getting too much, so I've stopped it and am giving her vitamins and pro-biotic until I re-introduce her to the flock.
     
  8. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 15, 2007
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    You will find some sort of dosage on the bottles... usually for pigs and cows. You can choose to scale down the rate; or the rule I've heard for chickens is 1/2 CC daily. I was giving 1.5 CC daily since geese are obviously larger.

    I think you would have to be incredibly overdosing a duck to actually cause it any harm. As with dewormers it's more dangerous to underdose than overdose.
     
  9. DrakeMaiden

    DrakeMaiden Overrun with Drakes

    Jun 8, 2007
    Kitsap County, WA
    Thanks greyfields. The antibiotic we had was for poultry, but meant to be added to drinking water. I had a h3ll of a time measuring out such a small quantity to mix for one duck's water usage for 24 hrs, because I didn't have a sensitive enough scale. After driving myself mad by splitting 2.5 g in halves 6 times, using a razor blade and a mirror -- no jokes please -- I then realized ducks drink way more water than chickens. I decided to dilute it as follows: 1/3 solution to 2/3 water, and just let it be. It seemed to take immediate effect, but she started to drink less and less over a few days and look a little dazed, so I quit. Now she's looking spunky again and drinking a lot more water. PHEW!
     
  10. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 15, 2007
    Washington State
    If you are using injectible amoxycillin or penecillin, get an insulin syringe from a pharmacy. They're perfect for the small doses you need for chickens and waterfowl. I usually give it right in the back of the thigh. It seems to be a nice meaty spot.

    Of course, I market all my birds as antibiotic free, so then the hard part is dealing with the 'tainted' product... which is probalby a billion times healthier than grocery store meat. But nonetheless, these animals are destined for our own freezer and not for sale.
     

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