Goose Information

Discussion in 'Geese' started by Lofty Dreams, Jul 22, 2011.

  1. Lofty Dreams

    Lofty Dreams Chillin' With My Peeps

    728
    4
    131
    Apr 9, 2010
    Minnesota
    A POND FULL OF GESSE

    GEESE INTRODUCTION
    Male geese are called ganders and a female is called a goose.

    GOSLINGS
    They can be brooded like chicks except that they need ½ of a square foot for two weeks that should be doubled every two weeks until six square feet. Temperature should be 90 degrees F six inches above the litter. Place the goslings under the heat source. After ten days reduce the temperature by 5 degrees F slowly or they might die until the temperature is 70 degrees F. They must stay dry and clean with fresh air in their brooder without drafts and they mustn’t get too wet for three weeks. Put rags or burlap bags on the floor for the first weeks if they are on wire. If they are raised on a wire floor use 3/8 of an inch, don’t put small breeds on it. The bedding shouldn’t be made of fine particles because they can ingest it. Give access to food and water at all times and make sure it’s large enough for their heads. Do not use medicated feed, use a starter mash that can find at local feed mills. Feed starter for the first three weeks then switch to a grower mix. You can give small amounts of grit and greens when they’re three weeks old. After six weeks they should be able to be free range.

    HOUSING , PREDATORS AND PARASITES

    Housing
    Duck require four to five feet per bird. Geese require five to six feet .One nest holds four-five hens. One idea for a nest is a barrel with one side open as long as it is secured to not roll.

    Predators
    They can be avoided with fencing and storing feed in metal storage bins. But if you have hawks attract crows with dog food and honey.

    Parasites
    External Parasites like lice and mites can be removed by washing the birds with a lice shampoo or dusting them with a product designed for that purpose.

    Internal Parasites like tapeworms can be removed with wormer.

    CLASSES OF GEESE
    Heavy

    Medium

    Light

    GEESE BREEDS

    Heavy

    Class: Heavy
    Breed: Buff Toulouse
    Weight:
    Old gander: 26 lbs Old goose: 20 lbs
    Young gander: 20 lbs Young Goose: 18 lbs
    Disqualifications:
    Dewlap: no dewlap on mature birds
    Bill: Knob
    Recognized: Ornamental
    Flight: no
    Eggs: 20-50
    Characteristics: large, lose feathered, dewlap


    Class: Heavy
    Breed: White Embden
    Weight:
    Old gander: 22 lbs Old goose: 18 lbs
    Young gander: 18 lbs Young Goose: 15 lbs
    Disqualifications:
    Plumage: no other colors then white
    Recognized: meat
    Flight: no
    Eggs: 40-60
    Characteristics: blue eyed


    Class: Heavy
    Breed: Brown African
    Weight:
    Old gander: 22 lbs Old goose: 18 lbs
    Young gander: 18 lbs Young Goose: 15 lbs
    Disqualifications:
    Bill: no knob ,other then the color black
    Dewlap: no dewlap, other then the color black
    Wing: white in primaries or secondaries
    Recognized: meat
    Flight: might
    Eggs: 30-50
    Characteristics: knob, dewlap

    Medium

    Class: Medium
    Breed: Buff Saddleback Pomeranian
    Weight:
    Old gander: 17 lbs Old goose: 15 lbs
    Young gander: 15 lbs Young Goose: 13 lbs
    Disqualifications:
    Dewlap: distant dewlap
    Feet and Shanks: not red orange
    Recognized: meat, ornamental
    Flight: no
    Eggs: 20-40
    Characteristics: has a saddle shape on back

    Light


    Class: Light
    Breed: White Tufted Roman
    Weight:
    Old gander: 12 lbs Old goose: 10 lbs
    Young gander: 10 lbs Young Goose: 9 lbs
    Disqualifications:
    Plumage: not pure white
    Tuft: no tuft
    Recognized: ornamental
    Flight: Might
    Eggs: 20-40
    Characteristics: tuft of feathers on head

    This was a 4-H project I used the Standered of Perfection
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2011
  2. pete55

    pete55 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,743
    76
    171
    Feb 19, 2011
    Suffolk, UK
    This is a very well presented report of some sound information and has obviously taken sometime and research to produce. My congratulation and thanks for positing some quality information. Well done [​IMG]

    Just one small point is goslings should be introduced to tender grass from an early age although protected in a secure pen. As long as the weathers pleasant they should befinefor few hours outdoors. They do seem to do well once on the grass and it keeps them busy.

    Thanks again for all your hard work.

    Pete [​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by