Goose safety

Discussion in 'Geese' started by cdclark, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. cdclark

    cdclark Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 4, 2011
    I'll be moving back to Northern California soon (specifically, in the Placerville area) and need to build or buy a cage for my 22 yr old goose. He had a big back yard to roam in here that has a 6ft wooden fence. The only visitor he's had is a possum who comes every night to eat his food. He's not crazy about sharing, but they don't get into it.

    Placerville will be another story. The house I'm buying is on an acre, out in the woods, and has no fencing at all. The area has all kinds of wildlife who would love to snack on Mr Goose, so I need to make sure he's protected. There's a shed in the back where I can put him at night, but I'd like to have as big an outdoor roaming area as possible for him without breaking the bank since it really needs to be a box.

    I've looked online at dog runs and they seem to be either very expensive or very flimsy. I need something that's reasonably priced and very sturdy. I can build it, if necessary, if I know what materials to get. There are a couple of tall 6x6 posts set in concrete in the back that I could use.

    Does anyone have any ideas about what I should get and where I can get it?

    Also, I'll be cargo freight flying him, my cats and parakeets... anybody know (1) what the length of digestion is (in other words, when should I take away his food so he doesn't poop in the dog crate he's flying in) and (2) how long can he go without food or water? If anyone knows the same things about cats, I'd appreciate it. (Also, I want to build something for the cats so they can get some safe outdoor time... their lives will change in Placerville because it's just not safe for them to be outdoors... too many predators.)

    Thanks!!!

    Carol
     
  2. 3dogs

    3dogs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Congratulations on the elderly goose - and your new home!

    Have you checked with the airline about flying the goose in a dog crate? They may require an *approved* shipping box.

    Chainlink fencing is probably your best bet. An electric wire near the bottom to discourage diggers, and another at the top for climbers would be recommended. The posts should be set in concrete.
     
  3. cdclark

    cdclark Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 4, 2011
    Thank you! I just wish I were finished with the packing... the truck will be here on Saturday.

    Mr G will fly in an airline-approved large dog crate, the same one he flew in when we moved here.

    Chain link sounds formidable enough, thanks. Great idea to include electric wiring top and bottom, too.

    Thanks!

    Carol
     
  4. Baybrio

    Baybrio Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can try Craigslist for the chainlink dog kennel panels. They are usually about $150 for a complete 6 x 12 kennel around here, often less. I use an extra panel over the top. It won't stop burrowers but might give your goose some outside time in the short term.
     
  5. cdclark

    cdclark Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 4, 2011
    Great idea... thanks!

    Carol
     
  6. mominoz

    mominoz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You might get "horse fence" a 2" x4" woven wire roll. It comes in 4ft.5ft.6ft. rolls.It does run about1.50$ a foot. But it last forever. You could use green T poles or wood poles and make a 'yard' and run hot wire top and bottom and have a 'night box' for him.It is cheaper and easier to put up than cyclone fence and doen't have all those parts!Or you construct your own Kennel by cutting it and lacing it together or using fiberglass roof panels for a top. There is a cheaper welded wire, but it won't last as long and isn't as tough. Running a hot wire top and bottom would keep out possums and raccoons and climbers and dogs and coyotes unless they jump it. I have horse fence for myterriers yard and they can't stick their heads thru it. Then I have some permeter field fence on my pasture for geese & runners . i have cheaper welded wire 4ft. on their day yard that is hotwired top and bottom.For hot wire get a solar charger 100$ or a dog chager (plug in) for about 35.$ You can get a roll of aluminum or steel wire to run it along top and botttom 1/4 mile runs about 14.00$ connecters are around 6.)0 a bag for 25.average ones. You can get this at Tractor Supply or Home Depot, Lowes etc.
     
  7. cdclark

    cdclark Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 4, 2011
    Very useful info... thank you!

    Carol
     
  8. goosedragon

    goosedragon Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 28, 2009
    Central NC
    Quote:Not to confuse you but there is also flexible net with built in electrical wires and simple to install step in posts. These are best used in places where you want to move his pasture about on say a weekly basis. AS you know he is going to eat all the green stuff in his normal run fairly quickly leaving a muddy poopy mess. but if you move half of this fence over a little he will have a fresh patch to destroy while his old area is returning to fresh green life and using all that poop to make the grass grow better! the big advantage of this is that it is so light weight and easy to set up that one person can move and set up in about an hour! It depends upon the electrical wires built right into the net for protection against preditors except ones that can fly.
    One roll (164 ft) weighs only 23 lbs. White vertical plastic strings are "welded" to black and white electro-plastic horizontal strings. They are supported by 1/2 in. diameter white plastic PVC posts--which are spaced throughout the netting. Each post has a small, steel spike that's inserted into the ground for support.
    The process, in simplified form, is:

    Untie the strings that keep the 164 ft roll together.
    Unroll just 6 ft of it.
    Unfold just 14 folds (each fold is 6 ft).
    Insert the posts by hand or foot.
    Attach a suitable fence energizer. And it's ready to keep your poultry in and their predators out

    You can read more about it at this website:
    http://www.premier1supplies.com/poultry/species.php?mode=article&species_id=6

    Might I suggest you get a catalog from that website? I found mine very helpfull when I had the time and money to invest in wire, It basically tells you everything you might want to know about electrical fences. I am sure there are cheaper versions out there, but I have used this supplier and his costomer and technical service was worth the extra money IMHO. This electrical net makes a nice day run for any kind of poultry. You said there was a shed on the property? Turn this into a preditor proof "fort" for Mr. Goose to spend his nights safe and secure from everything. Wire fence is hard work to install and you don't want to have to redo it once you have it installed. Your money, your choice!
     
  9. cdclark

    cdclark Out Of The Brooder

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    Hmmmm... I hadn't heard of this as an alternative. I like the mobility of it for the reasons you mentioned, the ease of setting it up, etc. 42" high isn't very much, though... seems like foxes, coons, coyotes (more common in that area), and cougars and bears (less common, but still there) would be able to leap over 42".

    I'll check out the web site more thoroughly. Thank you!!!

    Carol
     
  10. Sumatra503

    Sumatra503 Kozy Orchard Farms

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    Only downside is the expense of the eletrified netting. It is pretty pricey in my experience. Be sure you know exactly how much you need before you order and that you have a way to maintain the fence line often.

    I use a woven wire fence and it keeps out the neighbor's 150lb chow mix, so it is pretty sturdy. It is also readily available.
     

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