Gosling color & male/female ratio

Discussion in 'Geese' started by allergymama, May 14, 2016.

  1. allergymama

    allergymama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We recently hatched 5 goslings Toulouse/buff cross. 4 are some version of gray, one is bright yellow. Will she be white? Is that even possible with buff Toulouse cross?

    Also, we have only had male/female ducks with female geese in the past. We don't know the sex of these but are wondering if there are recommendations for male to female ratios with geese like there are for ducks.
     
  2. Rock Sister

    Rock Sister Out Of The Brooder

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    Yellow will be white.
    Touloose giving u gray pattern?
     
  3. allergymama

    allergymama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes. My profile pic is of two of them. You can see the left one is the yellow, the other is a gray pattern (all 3 of the others look like this one).
     
  4. Rock Sister

    Rock Sister Out Of The Brooder

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    So I think that mix will produce 25% white, 25% buff/white and 50% toulouse color.
    Breed grey back to a splash and you should see 50% original and 50%' splash or white?
    You need to figure out dominate/ recessive colors first.

    There are some people on here that have it down... Maybe they can explain better. :)
    I breed Buff geese. Haven't played with their genetics yet lol too busy with my chickens lol
    Beautiful babies [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2016
  5. allergymama

    allergymama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you, that helps a lot!
     
  6. Rock Sister

    Rock Sister Out Of The Brooder

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    Goose ratio:

    I keep mine in braces of 4 females to 1 male. Same as all water fowl. Some do 3/1 but I like girls to be in pairs and one male. More eggs, less roughness on females because he takes turns. They prefer to breed in water so that gets exhausting if he only has a couple to work with. All water fowl work together as one large group to look more threatening if you have enough. Makes them safer, keeps females from being overworked and boy oh boy, 4 make the best 12 egg poundcake ever!
     
  7. allergymama

    allergymama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is just what I needed to know. Now to wait until we can figure out who is a boy and who's a girl!!

    And I'll be asking for a recipe for that pound cake next year I hope!!
     
  8. Rock Sister

    Rock Sister Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok so found this:

    "Because the buff color gene is recessive, a cross between a Buff and a Gray will yield only Gray offspring. One of those birds (often called splits) mated to a Buff should yield some Buffs as well as some Grays. I should mention that there is also a pure white version of the Toulouse being shown occasionally but the few I have seen have so far to go in terms of Toulouse type to be competitive that at best it must be considered a work in progress at this time."

    So, would that mean you have a split pair? And the reason for the white? Help???:/


    And you said buff/Toulouse... Is that American buff and touloose? Or buff Toulouse /grey touloose?
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2016
  9. allergymama

    allergymama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 26, 2014
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    T

    We don't have the parents, they were eggs we ordered (from this site!)

    They were "Toulouse X buff geese hatching eggs"

    Sorry I'm not sure what's going on with typing this answer in ...
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2016

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