1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Got an olive egg today, but I don't have an olive egger?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by gritsar, Sep 30, 2011.

  1. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
    113
    408
    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    I have several pullets that have just started laying or will soon start.

    Sally is a turken/brahma cross. Polly is a turken/??, I suspect full turken. Annie is a turken/??, could be turken/EE, 4 sex links including a true tail-less one and a minorca.

    I know Sally lays an extremely large brown egg, as does Polly. I know minorcas lay white eggs. And I was thinking all of my sex links would lay brown, even the tail-less one.

    Yesterday and today I have found a pullet sized egg that is definitely olive in color. I know for a fact that it's not from my EE that lays a lighter green egg.

    So who laid it? My money is on Annie as she is possibly half EE, but I thought the colored egg gene was passed from the father's side? [​IMG]
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

    19,937
    3,094
    476
    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    Quote:Quit thinking. You'll get another one of those headaches. The blue egg gene can come from either parent. It is not sex linked.

    The shade of green or blue depends on how much, if any, brown is put on top of the blue shell. Use some sandpaper and scratch the coating off the egg. It is blue underneath. Break the egg and remove the inner membrane. What you are seeing is blue.

    I would have thought you had seen this before. The basic egg shell is either blue or white. The blue gene is dominant so if just one copy is present, the egg shell will be blue.

    There are many different genes that determine the shade of brown laid on top of the blue or white basic shell.

    Blue + no brown = blue egg
    Blue + light brown = mint green egg
    Blue + dark brown = olive green egg.

    White + no brown = white egg
    White + light brown = light brown egg
    White + dark brown = dark brown egg

    There are a tremendous number of different shades of brown that can be added and I'm pretty sure there are some other genes that affect the actual shade of white or blue for the basic egg shell. With chicken genetics, little is really simple or straightforward. But hopefully this will help you find the guilty pullet.
     
  3. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
    113
    408
    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Quote:Quit thinking. You'll get another one of those headaches. The blue egg gene can come from either parent. It is not sex linked.

    The shade of green or blue depends on how much, if any, brown is put on top of the blue shell. Use some sandpaper and scratch the coating off the egg. It is blue underneath. Break the egg and remove the inner membrane. What you are seeing is blue.

    I would have thought you had seen this before. The basic egg shell is either blue or white. The blue gene is dominant so if just one copy is present, the egg shell will be blue.

    There are many different genes that determine the shade of brown laid on top of the blue or white basic shell.

    Blue + no brown = blue egg
    Blue + light brown = mint green egg
    Blue + dark brown = olive green egg.

    White + no brown = white egg
    White + light brown = light brown egg
    White + dark brown = dark brown egg

    There are a tremendous number of different shades of brown that can be added and I'm pretty sure there are some other genes that affect the actual shade of white or blue for the basic egg shell. With chicken genetics, little is really simple or straightforward. But hopefully this will help you find the guilty pullet.

    Lately everything hurts my head, not just thinking. Better living through pharmacology. [​IMG]

    Okay, so I'm guessing that Annie's mom is the EE and Impy did to her what Impy did best so I ended up with an olive egger. I think....oh danggit! I wasn't supposed to think.....Runs off to find my pill bottle again.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2011
  4. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
    113
    408
    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Things are fixin' to get pretty wild in the chicken yard as my new roosters are a cochin/silkie cross and a phoenix cross. [​IMG]
     
  5. Johnn

    Johnn Overrun With Chickens

    8,666
    615
    316
    Sep 5, 2011
    some one told me you can tell what chicken lays wich colour egg by looking at a little patch of feathers around there ear or behind it?
     
  6. duckinnut

    duckinnut Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,933
    74
    173
    Jul 18, 2010
    Marshfield, Ma.
    What I need is a chicken that lays a different color every time to keep the "chicken math" to a reasonable minimum. You know what I mean. A brown then a green,blue ,white,chocolate,olive,pink and then start the cycle over.
     
  7. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
    113
    408
    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Quote:Yeah by the earlobes. White ear lobes lay white eggs, red ear lobes lay brown...I think I remembered that correctly.

    Doesn't help with my olive egger though. She doesn't have green earlobes. I know which one it is now, Annie. I just wasn't aware that her mother was an easter egger.
     
  8. Birdgirl

    Birdgirl Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 18, 2009
    Indiana
    maybe its the tail-less one. dont they have rumpless araucanas?
     
  9. Achickenwrangler#1

    Achickenwrangler#1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,431
    66
    183
    Aug 7, 2011
    west virginia
    the patch of feathers does indicate the egg color! but I think that green egg gene may throw it some, am waiting to see since I got alot of that trait in my younger pullets. both have white earlobes and green legs.
     
  10. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
    113
    408
    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Quote:That's what I was thinking, but I'm fairly certain that it's the turken X. I have seen her going into the nestbox. I'm not sure but I don't think the rumpless one is laying just yet.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by