Graphic: bloody chick hatching...... Normal? First incubating experience...

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by chick-a-dee1984, May 29, 2014.

  1. chick-a-dee1984

    chick-a-dee1984 In the Brooder

    38
    0
    32
    Sep 1, 2013
    [​IMG]


    It's chirping and wiggling. Pipped about 27 hrs ago. This is my first time incubating eggs. Is all this blood normal?


    Sorry for the graphic picture :( I just want to help this little gal (or guy)!
     
  2. sdm111

    sdm111 Free Ranging

    10,784
    10,140
    626
    May 21, 2013
    S. louisiana
    Did someone try to help it?looks like someone did I've never seen a chick try to zip like that. I know why but too long for me to type. Short answer there's about an 80% chance it won't make it
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2014
  3. chick-a-dee1984

    chick-a-dee1984 In the Brooder

    38
    0
    32
    Sep 1, 2013
    I just tried to help it right before I posted this. But, it hasn't tried to zip. It pipped yesterday about noon or a little after. It's beak has been like it is now. I tried to help it and noticed a lot of blood. When it pipped, it was thru the bottom of the egg not the top, and I turned the egg over last night, so it would be face up. I may have hurt it. :(
     
  4. happyhens1972

    happyhens1972 Songster

    1,070
    1,104
    246
    Jul 24, 2013
    Worcester, UK
    The blood in the vessels that feed the chick during incubation has to retract and the yolk needs to be absorbed before the chick is ready to hatch. In this case, the blood vessels are still active and have now bled, causing a haemorrhage. Sadly it is likely the blood loss will kill the chick but you must not interfere further or you risk more bleeds and a chick with unabsorbed yolk.
     
  5. chick-a-dee1984

    chick-a-dee1984 In the Brooder

    38
    0
    32
    Sep 1, 2013
    Ok. I'll let nature takes it course. I hate to see it struggling though.

    Thanks
     
  6. sdm111

    sdm111 Free Ranging

    10,784
    10,140
    626
    May 21, 2013
    S. louisiana
    As the chick is getting ready to hatch the yoke is absorbed and the blood vessels in the internal membrane seal up so all the blood goes to the chick. When you tried to help it the blood vessels were not sealed up yet and they ripped causing it to bleed like it did. I have helped many many chicks out with success but there is a time window when it must be done to be successful and you were too early. Sorry but we all learn as we go
     
  7. happyhens1972

    happyhens1972 Songster

    1,070
    1,104
    246
    Jul 24, 2013
    Worcester, UK
    I know it seems harsh but the struggle of hatching is part of the necessary process of strengthening the chick. Hatch is exhausting for them but it develops their muscles and their vigour. If we interfere, especially in the early stages, we risk the chick dying in the shell from our efforts or just being a weak chcik who will not thrive.

    Give this one a chance, it may not be too late. Make sure your humidity is up around 70% and keep an eye to see if the membrane is staying moist or drying up. It is not at all unusual for a chick to go 24 hours or more between pip and zip, allowing time for those vital processes of blood and yolk absorption to take place, so this one at 27 hours wasn't desperately overdue.

    See how it gets on now. If it is peeping and wriggling, it is alive and therefore it has a chance.
     
  8. chick-a-dee1984

    chick-a-dee1984 In the Brooder

    38
    0
    32
    Sep 1, 2013
    What is that time window?
     
  9. happyhens1972

    happyhens1972 Songster

    1,070
    1,104
    246
    Jul 24, 2013
    Worcester, UK
    This isn't an exact science I'm afraid. You just need to watch to ensure the membrane remains moist and see if the chick begins to progress on its own. If it doesn't show any signs of that in a couple of hours but is still peeping and moving and seeming vigorous, then you could try chipping the EGG SHELL away for it, leaving the membrane intact and only removing it from the 'lid' of the egg....where the chick would naturally zip around the air cell. Do it bit by bit and then return the egg to the incy to see if it continues under its own stean HOWEVER every time you interfere with this one, all your other eggs are at risk from the drop in temperature and humidity so its also a judgement call....is the life of this one worth potentially sacrificing the life of the others for?

    I wish there was an easy 'one size fits all' answer for you but there just isn't. We interfere with nature by using an incubator, often causing problems that may not have arisen naturally and then we are left with difficult choices as to whether we should attempt to put them right and if so, how and when.

    Put in a search for assisted hatches on here and you will find lots of info but much of it will conflict and you will need to choose which way to go.

    I wish you the very best of luck.

    Oh and please do not think I am criticising in any way, I had a hatch 6 days ago and had to make the same decision....I assisted, got a very malformed chick and have spent ever since giving her intensive care.....but she is now thriving and running around with her siblings like it never happened so my decision turned out well in the end....but it could so easily have gone the other way or resulted in a need to cull the chick I so lovingly helped out!
     
  10. chick-a-dee1984

    chick-a-dee1984 In the Brooder

    38
    0
    32
    Sep 1, 2013
    [​IMG]

    Meet Amelia! She zipped last night at about 11:00 pm and hatched at 11:22 pm! So happy! Thanks for all of the info friends!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: