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grass enough

Discussion in 'Nutrition - Sponsored by Purina Poultry' started by Josh Small, Oct 17, 2016.

  1. Josh Small

    Josh Small Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 16, 2016
    Is grass enough protein for my chicken
     
  2. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Long Beach, WA
    NO.
     
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  3. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    A nutritionally balanced and complete feed.
     
  4. KadenL

    KadenL Out Of The Brooder

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    Scottsdale Arizona
    grass has almost no nutritional value at all and really is only viable as a source of fibre. Your chickens need protein, even if it's in the form of hard-boiled crushed eggs, and grains such as alfalfa, along with calcium and sodium, adding FOOD GRADE diatomaceous earth and crushed egg shells may help with this. Non food grade diatomaceous earth may harm your chicken and make it sick. Add diatomaceous earth to their feed in a small amount, and give them access to sand to bathe in and use for their crops so they can digest food like the grass and alfalfa, not to mention being able to crush the egg shells. Your chickens will die if you only feed them grass.
     
  5. yeye5

    yeye5 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I apologize for posting in a thread rather than starting a new thread. I would start a new asking how to start a new thread...but you see my problem there. My laptop is not working and I've never used a tablet before on this site.
    My original question is about Assume 17 dewormer. The label cautions against human eating eggs produced by chickens in the 2 day period after getting the med.
    Is it safe for chickens if I cook the eggs and give them those eggs?
    I don't want to take any risks at all with the well-being of my feathered sweeties.
    Thanks in advance!
    And also if anyone can explain how to start a thread from the tablet or phone format I'd appreciate that very much too!
     
  6. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Just toss the eggs. The medication does make it's way into the eggs. That's why you shouldn't eat them, nor should anything else.
     
  7. yeye5

    yeye5 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    OK, that does seem the safest option. I had just been thinking that perhaps the meds harm humans but since chickens are given it intentionally that it might be safe. But again, nothing is worth taking chances with their health!
    Not that this next is a viable idea for me but I wonder what would happen if a hen Sat on eggs after being given the med, or any med...not that I'll try it!
    Thanks for your input! And out go the eggs[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2016
  8. KadenL

    KadenL Out Of The Brooder

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    Just as a general rule, if I can't eat it I wont feed it to my animals, so I wouldn't.
     
  9. yeye5

    yeye5 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks both. I tossed them.
     
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  10. DrPatrickBiggs

    DrPatrickBiggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi Josh,

    The short answer is no, grass does not contain enough protein to maintain healthy birds that produce healthy eggs.

    To achieve balanced and complete nutrition, plan on feeding a complete feed, free-choice, meaning that there should always be fresh feed in your feeders. To maintain an optimum nutrition profile, make sure that at least 90% of your birds’ diet consists of a complete feed. Depending on your schedule, you may consider feeding your birds twice per day to make sure that they always have feed, but one time per day is a common practice as well (just keep an eye on the feed levels in the feeders to make sure that they are never running out of feed)
    One example is Purina Layena or Purina Organic Crumbles or Pellets. We formulated this feed to support your hen’s day-to-day performance and allow her to produce exceptional eggs, while maintaining the status of an organic flock.

    Each nutrient plays an important role in hen health and egg production and must be provided at the correct level. Complete layer feeds are formulated to provide the correct mix to keep hens happy and healthy. We start at the top with calcium and protein because they are two main features of complete fed that determine the effectiveness, depending on the life stage of a bird.
    Calcium is a powerhouse ingredient in layer feed. It promotes strong bones and egg shells. Therefore, the amount of calcium in a layer feed will need to be higher than that of non-layers. More importantly, hens need a slow-release calcium source. If the calcium isn’t provided in the layer feed, hens may pull the nutrient from their bones to create eggshells.


    Protein is also important. Protein contains building blocks, or amino acids, that keep muscles and internal plumbing running smoothly, as well as maintaining beautiful feathers. DL-methionine is one of those building blocks that is essential for the hen to stay healthy and continue to lay eggs.

    Vitamins are important for two reasons: bird health and egg production. Vitamins A, D, & E should be contained within any complete feed. These nutrients help maintain feathering, as they help transfer nutrients around the body and make proteins that maintain the overall health of the bird. Although it may not be as obvious, egg production is related to these vitamins and as well. For example, vitamin D3 is essential to aid in the uptake of calcium into bones and bringing it to be incorporated into the egg shell. On a related egg note, marigold extract gives you those rich, yellow yolks. All together, these components enhance the overall nutrition of the egg.
     
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