Great Horned Owl???

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by chickensinmaine, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. chickensinmaine

    chickensinmaine New Egg

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    Jan 26, 2011
    New to BYC. New to having chickens. I have lost a few chickens lately, started with 6 now down to 2. When described to a friend he suggested maybe a great horned owl, how might I know? What would the "victims" look like after attack? Also, the attacks are happening during the daylight and some maybe dusk. Also, one chicken is completely missing, would an owl take a chicken away? Thanks for any insight.
     
  2. Grim

    Grim Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 26, 2011
    if it was a great horned owl you wouldn't find the chicken. they would fly off with it. describe the bodies. someone can help narrow it down better as to what it is.
     
  3. chickensinmaine

    chickensinmaine New Egg

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    Jan 26, 2011
    Wow that was fast! Thanks for replying so quickly! The chickens are completely intact except the heads and necks are stripped clean to the bone.
     
  4. Grim

    Grim Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 26, 2011
    sounds like a possum or a weasel of some kind.
     
  5. fishman65

    fishman65 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    flat rock
    possum eat head and neck usually. Thats my guess.
     
  6. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    [​IMG] Great horned owls, although quite large, are unable to fly away with standard sized chickens. They will strip and scatter feathers somewhat like hawks and eat the head and brains first. Daybreak and dusk killings occur, but most killings take place in the dark. Hopefully you can lock up your chickens because they will return until all of your birds are gone.
     
  7. MissJenny

    MissJenny Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello, hello, hello and a great big [​IMG]


    Rather than focusing on the predator, focus on security. Make sure your birds are locked up tight after dusk, that nothing can get into them, that there are no tiny holes, no easy locks, no cheap wire. So sorry about your loss. I hope you are able to protect the two remaining hens.

    Jenny
     

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