Great Pyrenees (9 months old) training collar

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by eggcited2, Dec 16, 2011.

  1. eggcited2

    eggcited2 Chillin' With My Peeps

    467
    1
    129
    Jul 8, 2010
    Illinois
    Please no arguments, I am not trying to get a debate or argument started, but I do need to ask a question.

    I have found a training collar that instead of shock, it is a spray mist. The description says it is for training, with four levels of spray intensity. It has a distance of 300 yards, neck size up to 28 inches and is *remote* operated.

    In the description it does not say it is for barking only. It doesn't even mention barking in the info of it. It is listed in their collar training section, and not in their bark control section. However, when I called the store to make sure they have it in stock, the person I spoke to said it will only work for training a dog not to bark. For any other issue, I would have to buy a shock collar.

    Is the store representative right or could this be used for behavior training and not just for barking?
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2011
  2. eggcited2

    eggcited2 Chillin' With My Peeps

    467
    1
    129
    Jul 8, 2010
    Illinois
  3. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    What training we're you wanting to use it for? I have used a shock collar, but I like the kind that has a beep tone and a vibrate mode..... Often that is all I needed to get their attention from a distance. Wish they made one that had a speaker in it as well as a vibrate..... That way you could reprimand them when your in the house..but then they may think they are always hearing voices.. Hehe
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2011
  4. Sherry

    Sherry Chillin' With My Peeps

    628
    0
    169
    Apr 8, 2007
    Southern WV
    I have a friend that has an underground fence that uses the spray instead of the shock. Eli is a border collie/boxer mix and it works very well with him. I would think it would work with training the same as the shock collar does.

    ETA: I have a 7 month old Great Pyr/Anatolian Shep cross. I put in the fence that uses shock, and it works very well for him. He won't cross it at all, even to chase the Boston Terrier. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2011
  5. eggcited2

    eggcited2 Chillin' With My Peeps

    467
    1
    129
    Jul 8, 2010
    Illinois
    Quote:He thinks the chickens are toys, and does not understand they "break". I asked about the killing issue earlier, and since I am recovering from knee replacement surgery, I am not able to do any hands on training. I do not have any place I can fence up the chickens, they free range on 3 acres, I tried putting him in the fenced yard (5 ft tall chain link) for my house dogs, but he goes right over the fence as if nothing was there at all.
     
  6. Jamie_Dog_Trainer

    Jamie_Dog_Trainer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 8, 2008
    Washington State
    Quote:If the collar has a remote then it is a training collar, not a bark collar. It's the same principal as a shock type remote training collar.

    Before you purchase any kind of remote training collar I implore you to read up on the proper way of conditioning a dog to a collar. If you do it the right way you will have a very reliable dog in your hands, if done wrong, even just one time you will not only have a dog that is "collar wise" but you might even hurt your relationship with the dog. There's a universally proper way of conditioning your dog to the collar and the remote so that the dog doesn't realize you are controling the shock. If done correctly the dog will only associate the prior behavior to the correction. There's also the proper way to achieve the lowest possible stim (shock, or spray) to be effective for your dog. Level two might work for one dog while level five might be the right stim level for another. You do not want to use more stim on your dog that is required, that is abusive.

    Leerburg.com has a lot of threads, articles and information on remote training collars....
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2011
  7. greenfamilyfarms

    greenfamilyfarms Big Pippin'

    8,650
    40
    303
    Feb 27, 2008
    Elizabethtown, NC
    I've used the shock collar training collar, but don't have any experience with the spray type. What I do know is that GP's are very hardheaded, very smart dogs yet they are eager to please. I've had the most success with positive reinforcement (treats, praise, etc.) than negative with my 2 GPs, especially our male. There are times when discipline is needed, but just having a stern tone works on mine once the positive reinforcement is estimated. You can even use a clicker, but I haven't had the need to use one. Most of the time treats and praise work for mine.
     
  8. dainerra

    dainerra Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,473
    308
    246
    Jun 4, 2011
    my worry with the spray type is that the scent can get in the dog's fur and the correction doesn't "end" An e-collar might be a better solution.
     
  9. Jamie_Dog_Trainer

    Jamie_Dog_Trainer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 8, 2008
    Washington State
    I've used the spray collars for barking. The correction ends as soon as the spray shuts off. It is the sudden "shhhhhhttttt" sound and the immediate scent that is the correction.
     
  10. watchdogps

    watchdogps Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,375
    14
    153
    Jun 4, 2011
    Central Ohio
    The model shown is human operated, not a bark collar. Make sure its the same model, because they may be confused at the store and only have the bark one on the shelf.
    Now, I am not in favor of shock collars at all, but I do own this remote spray collar! (Well, an earlier version) I love it! I used it on one of my female ASDs when we lived in town and she was almost going over the fence at the mastiff next door. I only had to spray her once. At first, the beep was enough to bring her away from the fence (note- I beeped her as she was heading there with that look on her face, not when she was actually doing the leap and slam). After a few beeeps, she did decide to push her luck and continued forward after the beep. Got sprayed, ran back to the porch in horror, and didn't need sprayed again till next year.
    Now, I also tried it on my chessie for a differwnt issue, and she could care less. However, she also loves to be sprayed with the hose or squirt bottle
    I would def prefer this over the shock, esp in the hands of someone who hasn't had experience with remote collars. You still have the risk of poor timing making it ineffective, but the risk of creating aggression is almost non existent due to the lack of pain stimulus. A much safer option.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by