greginshasta not sure if a tractor is what you need

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Wooden_Pony, Sep 24, 2007.

  1. Wooden_Pony

    Wooden_Pony Chillin' With My Peeps

  2. greginshasta

    greginshasta Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 26, 2007
    Mount Shasta, CA
    Hi WP,

    No, since we have 10 birds we need to go with somthing larger. In fact, whatever it's going to be - in terms of style - it's going to be 10x12, the maximum sized structure we can build here without a permit. Sunny and I built the footing today and were just sitting here dicussing roof styles.

    I'm debating whether to pour concrete in the corners on which to set the pier blocks. The area we are working in, while very soft soil, has been undisturbed for a long time. Does anyone have an opinion if pouring mud (I'd probably use sonotube forms) would make a difference here? I will also be placing more pier blocks or cinder blocks under the floor hoists.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Wooden_Pony

    Wooden_Pony Chillin' With My Peeps

    Ok asked DH.

    He said you need to dig down and find the hard pack.

    Once you find the hard pack hold the sonotube up 8-12" above grade then pour concrete before concrete sets up push in pier supports.

    He says hope this helps [​IMG]
     
  4. greginshasta

    greginshasta Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 26, 2007
    Mount Shasta, CA
    Quote:Giggle. Hardpack. That's a good one. Funny guy.

    Living in Marin, we had clay. Finding hard pack wasn't a problem. It was just under the surface. But this is way different.

    We live on the edge of the volcano so the upper few feet are volcanic ash - basically sand and gravel. Down a few feet is gravel. That's it...

    Ask him, please, what now? Maybe there is a different interpretation of hard pack that I need to think about but I really don't have the sort of soil that we are accustomed to down in your area.
     
  5. Wooden_Pony

    Wooden_Pony Chillin' With My Peeps

    Ask him, please, what now? Maybe there is a different interpretation of hard pack that I need to think about but I really don't have the sort of soil that we are accustomed to down in your area.

    He said the gravel would be your "hardpack."

    [​IMG]
     
  6. greginshasta

    greginshasta Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 26, 2007
    Mount Shasta, CA
    It's hard to know where the gravel will be. Every time I dig around here it's a new surprise. In this case, I punched a test hole at one corner, and it's all sand. I might have to go 3-4 feet or more to find gravel. Like I say, this is all the foot of the volcano.

    I have an old post hole digger with the digging edge bent over from hitting too many rocks. It's the only salvation for clearing holes because the stuff here is so soft and powdery that a new "good condition" post hole digger simply won't contain the material. It all pours out when you raise up from the hole.

    I'm thinking I may go down a foot or so and call it good. Like I say, this soil where I'm working has not been touched in decades and it's packed to the level that this stuff has the ability to (which ain't much.) I'll set sonotube and pull some strings to get the tops level and pour.
     
  7. greginshasta

    greginshasta Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 26, 2007
    Mount Shasta, CA
    Got the holes punched. It's funny, I actually find myself yearning for the nasty clay at my former home. At least once you punched a hole the silly thing retained it's sides. This stuff is so soft that to clean out a hole it's sometimes easier to dig with your hand. The only thing I can compare this to is if your soil was a combination of dry beach sand and really dry flour or talcum powder. The holes literally collapse on themselves if you don't avoid hitting the sides with the tools. It does not stick together.


    WP - I'm curious about why hubby suggested 8-12" above grade, plus the height of the pier block. That puts us almost 20" above grade. Not that this is unusual for a coop, which we see occasionally quite high off the ground. But I see sheds that are quite low to the ground, which makes it easy to provide access (for example) for yard equipment such as a riding mower. If the assumption is that this is dual use (coop on one side, storage of chicken supplies and garden stuff on the other side), why the elevation? The foundation is all PT 2x6.
     
  8. TxChiknRanchers

    TxChiknRanchers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 18, 2007
    Southeast Texas
    IMO wouldn't dig and disturb the soil, instead place 12x12"x4" flats down then place blocks on that. Unless you are putting a steel bank vault in the coup this would be sufficient, also it would still be or could be considered "portable" [​IMG]

    R guidry
     
  9. suburbanhomesteader

    suburbanhomesteader Chillin' With My Peeps

    In Indiana, I was on pure sand and just put down 18" blocks under the 2-story, gambrel-roofed, 12x20 (in other words, HEAVY!!!) storage shed I built. It's been there for 6 years now and the floor is still level, walls still plumb. I was afraid of frost heaving, but if it heaved, it did it consistently.
     
  10. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    Sep 6, 2007
    spring hill, florida
    Hi, a rule of thumb for pole barns is 1/3 goes in the ground. I would have a pole in the ground every 8 feet. We have built several, and do use some cement. The roof angle depends on where you live. I need a minimal angle in Florida, and in New York, the roof angles went by snow loads. If you get snow, you want to get heavier wood . There are some good books out there for simple pole structures. Karen
     

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