Grit and Calcium options and substitutes

Discussion in 'Quail' started by YASIN, Oct 31, 2014.

  1. YASIN

    YASIN Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 26, 2010
    Chittagong , Bangladesh
    Hello

    I have some Quails which I have been keeping for 2 months ... they are fine Alhamdulillah and growing well , except dat they arent laying any eggs yet .....
    i had raised chickens (totally inside my house) and pigeons (in my balcony) during my school years wen I was in Qatar ... and I had always faced the problem of providing grit and proper calcium ... although all of them seemed to do fine without dem
    But i still i want to provide them with proper grit and calcium

    Here in Bangladesh , my grandmother (and many people around us ) keep free-range chickens and ducks ... they eat watever dey want , roam around freely and grow and reproduce just fine (here we live in a building with a large space around us , a pond , separate place for the animals and lots of trees, in Qatar we lived in a small rented flat) . they are fed with boiled rice (the left overs ) and another feed , i guess powdered husks of rice (we call it bhushi) mixed with the rice and water.

    But for my quails , i hav to keep them indoors (cant really open dem up or they will fly away) , only sometimes i used to open dem up in my caged garden ... so i have pretty much provide everything to dem myself

    For the grit , we dont really hav any like the ones i read on the internet , all that we hav are pieces of granite , cement and bricks , no much real stones or gravel .,
    and as for calcium , all i can give them is crushed egg shells , i cant get oyster shells or supplementary calcium feed ... we do hav lots of apple snails in our ponds

    So wat should I do ... or will they be just fine ....
    wat other safe grit options are dere ?
    how can i supplement dem with calcium properly ?? wat greens are rich in calcium and good for quails ??
     
  2. Lilyput

    Lilyput Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 25, 2014
    Raleigh, NC
    You are probably safest with boiled and crushed egg shells for the calcium. If there is a running stream or river nearby, a shovelful of that soil with small stones would help for the grit. Letting them into you garden with the soil would also probably give them enough grit. (Your free range chickens are doing fine because they have access to the soil.) I don't know of any other substitute.
     
  3. YASIN

    YASIN Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 26, 2010
    Chittagong , Bangladesh
    Thank u
     
  4. YASIN

    YASIN Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 26, 2010
    Chittagong , Bangladesh
    Are the stones dat are used in aquariums suitable as grit ??
     
  5. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend Staff Member

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    My Coop
    These are probably too large. You will need something as small as sand. Sand or dirt from your yard will work well. Just keep a tray of dirt you dig up from some place outside that has some tiny stones in it or sand like dirt and this will work as grit.
     
  6. Lilyput

    Lilyput Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 25, 2014
    Raleigh, NC
    Agree with two crows; and the aquarium stones may even be not stones at all but glass. Like I and Two Crows said, dig up some local dirt, if you have dirt from a stream even better, the chickens should find plenty of grit in it.
     
  7. YASIN

    YASIN Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 26, 2010
    Chittagong , Bangladesh
    Okay ..... i already put soil and sand for my quails ... so i dont think grit is an issue for me any more

    what all plants and foods (suitable for quail) are rich in calcium ??
     
  8. Sill

    Sill Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Since you are in a warm-ish climate consider growing moringa trees for your birds. The calcium content gram to gram is better than almost any other kind of food and it is also high in protein, vitamin C and other important nutrients. I grow my own moringa trees, dry the leaves and then grind them. I top dress my quail's feed with a sprinkling of powdered moringa leaves several times a week or give them a fresh leaf. Google moringa trees and tree of life to find out more about this nutrient dense super food.

    Another plant that should grow well where you are is duck weed, which has been used as a high protein feed source for animals. I grow duck weed for my birds and fish to eat as a supplement in an in-ground pond and several above-ground pots and barrels. When it's warm out the duck weed can double daily! I believe there are others here that feed their quail duck weed.

    Plants good for calcium are kale, collard and turnip greens. I clip leaves of these plants in my quails' cages a few times a week. Clipping them to the side of the cage makes it easier for them to tear off chunks of the leaves to eat and gives the quail something fun to do.

    The protein content of the grains you are feeding can be increased by soaking and/or fermenting. I feed my quail fermented feed and they LOVE it! Soaking and fermenting will also make the grain easier to digest. There are many threads on this forum about fermenting feed. I generally only soak/ferment my quail feed 24-48 hours, less than one would do for chickens.

    Hint: Leftover fermented feed makes great fish food or fertilizer for duck weed. I dry it in the sun before feeding it to fish to keep the water from clouding or throw it in wet for the duck weed.
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. YASIN

    YASIN Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 26, 2010
    Chittagong , Bangladesh
    i do lactoferment my feed and feed them a few times a week ...
    kale and collard arent available in my place ....

    i will search google for moringa and duckweed ....

    thanks anyway
     
  10. YASIN

    YASIN Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 26, 2010
    Chittagong , Bangladesh
    i googled duckweed .... it is very common in our place ... and for moringa , we used to eat its fruit before ..... so i think i might be able to obtain the leaves

    very much thank u
     

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