grit needed for yogurt?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by tankernav1, Apr 8, 2009.

  1. tankernav1

    tankernav1 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 20, 2009
    So I'm trying to get some grit but our farm store is so far away. I haven't been yet. My EE and Buff O. are 2 weeks old yesterday. Can I give them just a bit of plain yogurt? Or do I have to have the grit for that. I just keep hearing conflicting things. Since we are new to this I know I'll learn but they are doing so well I don't want to do anything wrong.
     
  2. CityGirlintheCountry

    CityGirlintheCountry Green Eggs and Hamlet

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    Put a little sand (not as fine as playsand) or gritty dirt in there. It's kind of like starter grit for the tee-tiny ones.

    Mine LOVE yogurt! It's turns into a food frenzy, especially if I dip my finger in yogurt and then in their crumbles. Yummy!
    [​IMG]
     
  3. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    I didn't offer grit for plain yogurt or hard boiled eggs. I figure grit is only needed for things that need "chewing" or grinding to digest.
     
  4. Nicola

    Nicola Chook Cuddlin' Aussie

    Feb 23, 2009
    ACT
    how old do they have to be to eat youghurt and does it help them when they are sick
     
  5. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Quote:I started offering yogurt at 10 days old. Some people start earlier, some later. I feel it's good for their digestion at any time.
     
  6. tankernav1

    tankernav1 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 20, 2009
    So I don't have to offer grit---that I don't have. I bought some plain organic yogurt at the store today. I really want to try it! Just put it in their brooder??
     
  7. lalaland

    lalaland Overrun With Chickens

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    Grit is what "grinds" the food in the gizzard - so for anything soft (yougurt, milk, cooked oatmeal....) it isn't necessary. If you are feeding cracked grains (oats, corn, etc) it is needed. When you see birds at the side of the road, they are often picking up gravel or"grit". Chickens and other birds will pick it up in the dirt. Some people who free range don't bother with grit.
    Most people offer it free will.
    There is such a thing as "chick grit" which is just smaller than regular grit. You can offer sand, as suggested, and pick up some grit later.

    For chicks, I sprinkle it like salt on their food til they grow up and choose it on their own (I keep a container of it next to a container of oyster shell for calcium - and the chickens take it when they want it. They sure use more in the winter when they can't get to bare ground.
     
  8. Opa

    Opa Opa-wan Chickenobi

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    Any thing you feed that could be dissolved or ground into powder with your hands would not require the supplemental feeding of grit. Once you start giving them greens and seeds they will need grit for their crop to function properly.
     
  9. lalaland

    lalaland Overrun With Chickens

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    oops, meant to answer your question about yogurt - sure = just put a little out. A bottle or jar cap sometimes makes a good container. Figure they will walk in it, fall in it, etc, and it is messy. you can put some on the end of your finger and offer it to them that way, too. Course, that won't work so well if you have lots of chicks.

    Don't worry if they are scared of it at first!
     
  10. tankernav1

    tankernav1 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 20, 2009
    Thank you, thank you. It seems I keep reading stuff but it never really answers my questions. Our girls are growing great, no problems, we are really happy with them. However I just feel that they should have something to look forward to that we humans can bring them. A couple of them are feeling more comfortable around us and 2 of them have fallen asleep on their backs on my daughter's lap. But the other 6 are still pretty skittish and I want to offer them some treats. Plus will they learn to free range better if they get used to stuff from a young age? So we will try the yogurt when my daughter gets home from Grandma's tomorrow. Thanks again!!!
     

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