Grower Feed for Geese

Discussion in 'Geese' started by percyj, Jun 20, 2010.

  1. percyj

    percyj Songster

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    Hello,
    I'm a new goose mother and I was wondering where I could get
    16% grower feed for my Sebastopol (am I spelling that right?!)
    geese. They are only three weeks, but I want to be prepared.
    Also, any tips on raising them??? Thx.[​IMG]
     

  2. TennesseeTruly

    TennesseeTruly Songster

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    You can get Grower/Finisher from Tractor Supply.

    Laurie
     
  3. percyj

    percyj Songster

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    Jun 20, 2010
    Thanks, is that an online store?
     
  4. greenfamilyfarms

    greenfamilyfarms Big Pippin'

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    I would suggest you get them started with a higher protein gamebird starter, then switch over to the regular chick starter once they start to get their feathers. If they are fed too high of a protein as their feathers develop, they could get angel wing, so keep an eye out. They grow really fast and the extra protein at the beginning with give them an extra boost. Also, they love greens - even something as simple as grass from the yard.

    You can find a TSC (Tractor Supply Co.) near you through their website - http://www.tractorsupply.com/
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2010
  5. percyj

    percyj Songster

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    So, at what age should I switch to grower? And what age should I switch to maintainence?
     
  6. Hillside

    Hillside In the Brooder

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    As long as they are getting a good quality food it doesn't matter what it is called except for layer. They never need that. Grower is good as a basic food offered all year round for life. Babies like you have will do well with a grower made for any kind of bird cut with oats and a little wheat or milo as well as some sunflower is good. Depends on what is available to you. Oats and sunflower are easy, the rest is extra if you want to. Goslings are made to break down fiber so oats and green food are important. They need space and exercise, no corn and no layer.
     
  7. Kim65

    Kim65 Songster

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    This is what I did with mine: 24% chick starter (unmedicated) till three weeks old. Then switched to 17% "all purpose" poultry feed from there on out. Goslings must have greens in their diet from hatch, too. Give coarsely chopped dandelion greens, chard, kale, dark green lettuces. They also like peas [​IMG] . If they will be on grass, they'll eat the new softer grass as well.

    I did provide layer feed for them when the goose was laying.
     

  8. percyj

    percyj Songster

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    There's so much for me to learn! I am feeling a little overwhelmed! I have read that letting them graze is a good idea in the summer. Is this true? Also, how much do you feed per goose?
     
  9. percyj

    percyj Songster

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    Oh, and as they get older, do you still have to feed them oats?
     
  10. GoodEgg

    GoodEgg Songster

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    I think you will get many different answers, but I like to start my babies with unmedicated chick starter. How much I feed depends on how much greens I can give them. I really like greens to compose as much of their diet as possible. I fed my most recent groups of 8 goslings a large cup about 3/4 full twice a day -- probably the equivalent of 12-14 liquid ounces (total for 8 goslings to share). I put them on pasture all day before they were two weeks old. By the time they were feathering out I cut back a bit on the food because it was 22% protein which is too high for growing geese.

    I have been advised by professionals I trusted to feed starter only when they are very young, putting them on good pasture as much as possible, and feeding pasture only when possible (which for me is maybe 9 months out of the year).

    I do give mine treats of veggie scraps, and they get a variety of weeds and grasses.

    I really believe pasture is the most healthful way to raise them. They are grazing animals.

    Just make sure it is good pasture. Overgrown grasses can be tough and dried grass has less nutrition for them.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2010

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