Growing plants from cuttings

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by destinduck, Oct 7, 2012.

  1. destinduck

    destinduck obsessed with "ducks"

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    I just wanted people to know this stuff has worked on every cutting I was ever given or cut off myself. Very very easy to use. Just some of the things off the top of my head I have used it on are Angel trumpets, figs, pears, orange trees.I think I got it at Walmart but not positive if not home depot. So next time you see a plant or tree you like cut off a limb or branch and watch just how easy it is to have your own clone of that plant. There may be other brand named products but I can only speak for this one. This stuff rocks.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. City Chicken

    City Chicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    just ordered some! plan to root some lavender and rose cuttings in my basement over the winter. so excited!
     
  3. Twister-n-Dos

    Twister-n-Dos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Nov 9, 2012
  4. GuineaHQ

    GuineaHQ Out Of The Brooder

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    I use the gel one for our frangapani cuttings I find the gel lasts longer
     
  5. GuineaHQ

    GuineaHQ Out Of The Brooder

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    City Chicken how do you go with the rose cuttings I have only tried once but they did not take
     
  6. flgardengirl

    flgardengirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sunny side up :)
    I like the rootone variety. It has an antifungal in it so works well in my climate. Powdered and gel rooting hormones work well on a lot of things but some things that are tougher to root work better with air layering.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2012
  7. City Chicken

    City Chicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    i have lavender cuttings going and they are doing great. haven't gotten to the roses yet...
     
  8. MrMisty

    MrMisty New Egg

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    You can easily root roses using the tent method. Here is a link that shows how to root softwood cuttings. This method is used for small quantities of roses.

    A Nearing Frame would also work. I have had good luck rooting roses in mine.

    I have found that rooting roses using my misting system does not work as well as I had hoped. Unlike other softwood cuttings, the roses do not root quickly under mist and tend to lose their leaves. They then just sit thee looking like dead sticks. However, when I let them sit through the winter, some have rooted and grew quite well.

    I prefer the liquid rooting compound. it is concentrated o I just need to dilute it to the correct ratio for the particular type of cuttings I am doing. Hardwood cuttings get a stronger dilution than softwood cuttings because they are harder.
     
  9. destinduck

    destinduck obsessed with "ducks"

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    I havent tried it yet with roses yet either city chicken.Guinea sounds like she has though. Sorry it didnt work too. Although I dont know why it wouldnt as long as the roots didnt dry out.This is what I personally find to be the most important when trying to get any cutting to grow. Cut it and get in the ground with the stuff put on the end(I dont worry about tapping off the excess) as soon as you can is how I do it. Water it well and make sure it stays very damp for a week. Thanks for sharing everyone. Im not a pro by any means and dont know if all rooting hormones are the same.The main thing I liked about this particular brand is its so easy and even though I havent tried it on roses yet its worked on every plant Ive tried it on. Now yall making me want to try it on roses too. LOL! Although heres something else I was thinking about now. The outside air temp may have alot to do with stuff taking off.
     
  10. MrMisty

    MrMisty New Egg

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    It is more humidity than temperature but temperature is a factor.

    The cutting has no roots to pull moisture up into it. The way the cutting gets moisture up into it is called transpiration. This transpiration process causes a slight vacuum to form in the stem of the cutting. This vacuum pulls moisture up through the stem and out to the leaves. The moisture is evaporated from the leaves which draws more moisture.

    The evaporation of the moisture also helps keep the cutting cool. Cuttings generally need cool tops, moist stems, and warm bottoms to root well.

    Here is an article that explains rooting cuttings a little better.
     

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