Guaranteeing the sex of an unhatched chick, is there such a thing?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by NanaArizona, Sep 22, 2012.

  1. NanaArizona

    NanaArizona Out Of The Brooder

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    Is there ANY WAY to guarantee to hatch out females??
    I sell eggs & DON'T want roosters & right now I do not want to have a separate area for Hens & Roos to multiply.
    If there IS a way, please enlighten me/us [​IMG]
    Thank You

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Frizzle13

    Frizzle13 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 16, 2012
    Not that I've heard of but I think the temp has somthing to do with it
     
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  3. WaterFowl209

    WaterFowl209 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Only in reptiles I believe, I wish it was that easy for chickens
     
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  4. Sweetlilbaby

    Sweetlilbaby Chillin' With My Peeps

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    When I'm able to keep the incubator at 99 to 99.5 i get more hens, 99.9 to 102 i end up with either 50/50 hens roosters, or mostly roo's.
    I know some say temp doesn't matter, but in the first few days of incubating the sex is determined. that is when it's most important to keep the temp at 99.5 (not higher) to get more females.
    Also I believe the rooster has something to do with it. in the past i had hatched 20 to 30 chicks at a time and only ended up with 3 or 4 roosters out of it. but once we got a new rooster the number of pullet chicks being hatched went down.
     
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  5. swirler

    swirler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sex is chromosomal in chickens, ZZ (male) and ZW (female). Temperature-dependent sex determination happens in (some) reptiles, not birds.

    It's possible that temperatures too low or too high might preferentially kill eggs containing male or female embryos, but that's not the same as incubation temperature influencing sex determination in the egg.
     
  6. WaterFowl209

    WaterFowl209 Chillin' With My Peeps

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  7. Frizzle13

    Frizzle13 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I once hatched out 30 chicks from different hens and the same roo. They were all pullets!
     
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  8. Steemroo

    Steemroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Several mad scientists I know here in the Steam World are trying to find ways to extract genetic information from eggs without ruining them.

    It should be possible (and is probably doable in labs in the so-called real world) - but is likely too expensive to market.

    Syringe, tiny hole in shell, squirt a drop of egg liquid on a sex hormone sensitive test strip, cook and eat if male - wax shut & return to incubator if female. :jumpy.

    That said, I've Googled this and found little Info - maybe using wrong keyterms - or no one's done it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2012
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  9. Steemroo

    Steemroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    "I know" and "info" - man it's hard to type on this Touchpad! Sorry.

    Ah I've discovered the magic EDIT button! Muhahahah.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2012
  10. WaterFowl209

    WaterFowl209 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Some pullets are just born to produce more males and some are born to produce females, it's all in the hens chemistry, the key is finding the hens that will produce more of the desired rooster or hen..sounds simple but it's not
     

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