Guard dogs as both indoor and outdoor dogs?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Laurobee13, Oct 20, 2013.

  1. Laurobee13

    Laurobee13 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 1, 2012
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    Hello, we just got a Great Pyrenees/Anatolian Shep cross puppy (10 weeks old) and we intend for him to live solely with our flock and livestock. He was raised for this - both his parents are outdoor livestock guardians, and he has lived outdoors (with shelter) his whole life.

    My question is, if we allow him to come inside will he become "soft" and not guard are animals anymore, and only guard us? Or do you think he can establish a healthy bond between us and the animals at the same time?

    This is my first time with a dog thats sole job is to protect, so any advice is helpful!

    (He has lots of shelter, access to clean water and food, and plenty of warms spots to get out of the wind)
     
  2. Personally I would let him come in the house! I really don't see why not!
     
  3. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    This very much a proximity issue assuming dog is not properly bonded to stock it is to protect. If bonded odds are it will stay with stock. Not all dogs will stay with charges if given access to house and not all will come into house. I have dogs (not LGD's) that protect poultry very well. They are not imprinted on poultry as intended but they respond to threats very well. Dogs have access to house though pet door but during night the spend most of time out side. In my setting staying with all roosting birds is not possible since roosts are dispersed, therefore dogs usually concentrate their activities in close proximity to house and periodically patrol property. In addition going after threats they detect themselves, they also respond to alarms made by chickens. Your dog can learn to do same very easily despite that not being a part of its breeding.

    Downside of dogs going in and out is tracking of stuff onto floor and the occasional varmint brought in. Live opossums can be all sorts of fun but worst is dead skunk dog kills.
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    An issue for me would be that when they are in the house, they are not out protecting the livestock.
     
  5. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    That is the proximity part. If stock and house are close and dog not properly bonded which probable with poultry, then dog needs to at least focus on location. Detection of predator can be very easy when based on sound and reaction time can be short if distance covered is short.
     
  6. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    A dog in the house is a PET.
    Real guard dogs belong in the pasture
     
  7. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Real guard dogs actually guard, not just look big and pretty standing around doing nothing but being judged by parties that have little or no experience using dogs in any capacity.
     
  8. Laurobee13

    Laurobee13 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the advice everyone! Keep it coming!

    Just some clarification - our plan is when the birds are out, the dog is out - so the coming inside aspect that I am talking about would be at night before we go to bed. The dog (we haven't named him yet) will always sleep outside right next to our coop and llamas. I want him to bond to us also, so that is why I would want him to hang out inside just for a few hours each night.
     
  9. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    System can work. Make certain dog's movements not obstructed by fencing which can be realized by educating dog how to clear them or have the equivalent of a doggie door dog can use to go through fence. I assuming dog will be acquired when still impressionable, so make certain it is bonded to all stock which llama may not make easy. Make certain pup does not get into a real predator itself until more than a year old so you will have only an alarm system through that time. Also think about ranging habits of poultry so they do not get beyond dog's protective umbrella.
     
  10. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Exactly
    There's no livestock to guard in the house, and a dog that only shows up AFTER the predator attacks hasn't done it's job

    Quote: Nighttime is when most predator attacks occur
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2013

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