Guinea Thief

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by GuineaFowling, Nov 14, 2014.

  1. GuineaFowling

    GuineaFowling Chillin' With My Peeps

    561
    17
    101
    Oct 3, 2013
    Central California
    So now-a-days it gets dark around half past 4 and we start cooking dinner about that time. Our recipe required some green chillies so I sent my sister out to get some fresh peppers from the garden. She came back quickly talking about hearing some noise near the coop and then seeing a persons shadow. I just had a late hatch of guinea keets and they are 2 weeks old so mama guinea cant have them all under her so there is a heat lamp on in the coop so they dont die of cold. I dont know if its the light that attracted the thief or he new they were already there. As lil' sis was explaining what she saw, our guineas started screaming. All three of us ran out muttering crazy threats at whoever was on our property.

    I feel like this was one of those moments in a horror movie where the idiots go to investigate unprepared and defenseless, because thats what we were. Unprepared, I tell you. We had no shoes, no flashlight, and nothing to defend ourselves with. Half way out it hit me so I turned back to grab some shoes. I think my sister realized also, for she raced into the house to retrieve a flash light.

    My younger sister was out barefoot with a broom as her weapon. We didnt see anyone near the coop, but we didnt really care to thoroughly look to see of the thief was still hiding somewhere. The guineas are our main concern since they are practically our children. I went into the coop and the guineas were screaming and jumping about. The keets were all over the floor wondering what the commotion was about. A little thing about my guineas is that they scream and make a fuss when they see someone they have never seen before. I can go into their coop in the middle of the night and they wont make a sound because they know its me and recognize my voice. I put all the guinea keets and their mother back into the box, looked around and made sure it wasnt a opposum or anything before running back to the house. My sisters where looking around for any signs of someone.

    we were not well equipped so we walked back towards the house. The younger sister had the flashlight and stood guard watching over the coop just in case the burglar showed up. Our coop is pretty close to the house and next to the fence the divides our property from the neighbors. I went in and retrieved my bow and arrows while my other sister went to get the gun. I stepped out into the yard with an arrow notched onto the bowstring when suddenly we hear someone hopping over the fence into the neighbors yard. My older sister strictly told us not to go near the coop until she returned. I would of loved to stick an arrow in the back of the *** who thought he could steal my feathered children but I stayed.We heard an engine roar and then a car race away. By the time my sister got out with the gun the thief was gone. We stayed out and investigated, found some foot prints and such. I am hoping the thief doesnt return but if he does we will be more prepared. I have a feeling it could have been someone who knows where we live and that their are guinea keets. Will be speaking to the neighbor tomorrow and possibly considering getting a guard dog.
     
  2. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

    11,539
    5,067
    501
    Mar 27, 2012
    Vermont
    My Coop
    That's awful! You might also consider putting a padlock on the coop. That might be enough to dissuade the thief and if it isn't, they'd have to make a terrible noise trying to get in, and that would certainly get the guineas going, making even more noise. No way you could miss that and then you'd be able to stop them for sure. I would also make a report to the police so if you catch the person there's already a report to build on.
     
  3. sunflour

    sunflour Flock Master Premium Member

    13,835
    2,694
    416
    Jan 10, 2013
    Macon,GA
    What a horrible experience. I agree you should report the incidence and put real locks on your coop. Think about getting some kind of motion alarm…good luck;
     
  4. GuineaFowling

    GuineaFowling Chillin' With My Peeps

    561
    17
    101
    Oct 3, 2013
    Central California
    Thank you all for your suggestions.

    I have reported the incident and will be putting a padlock on the coop. I will also be getting motion censored lights as that usually wards off thieves.
     
  5. sunflour

    sunflour Flock Master Premium Member

    13,835
    2,694
    416
    Jan 10, 2013
    Macon,GA
    Your situation makes me so mad. Please give updates on what happens.
     
  6. Outpost JWB

    Outpost JWB Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,455
    359
    228
    Mar 31, 2014
    Ohio
    WOW! That is scary. I am sorry for your situation. We had teenagers one time go through all of our cars on the street I used to live on, and rummage through our cars. They were looking for expensive items (GPS, Laptops, money). Boy did they pick the wrong neighborhood[​IMG]. Anyways, we called the police and reported it. They did later find the boys. Not sure what happened to them, but it felt like such a violation! We were very laid back about security until then. After that day we bought these alarms that go off if the door is opened and the code is not entered. Maybe you could look into something like that. Probably if they got away with it once, they will be back. Maybe not. Hope not.
     
  7. jmbwholesale

    jmbwholesale Chillin' With My Peeps

    69
    2
    71
    May 8, 2014
    I have layer hens, and in the coop next to them are chicks that will be layer hens come spring. I use baby monitors! I can hear everything from a snapping twig to a sniffle! It helps me know when I need to go out to get a freshly laid egg, or to shoot at a racoon! It would behandy for you as well! For five bucks at a thrift store, or $9. At Walmart, they are the best investment you can make in my opinion. It's helped me a lot! I wish you the best in catching that would be thief! Hopefully he was homeless and passing through, hungry and thought "eggs" and hopefully will never return! Good luck! :)
     
  8. GuineaFowling

    GuineaFowling Chillin' With My Peeps

    561
    17
    101
    Oct 3, 2013
    Central California
    Thank you all.

    The baby monitor idea is brilliant. Especially since I have one somewhere in the house. I remember when I was a kid, my father bought tons of broiler chicks. they where in the coop and a opossum came in and killed all. We thought they were all dead but found 5 underneath a box safe and terrified. My father was bent on using the remaining chicks as bait so he could catch the perpetrator. The opossum didnt return but the chicks were two weeks old and a hungry stray cat got to them one by one and we heard it all on the baby monitor. It was terrible but we caught the cat and took her to a place where they needed a good mouser.

    If the thieves do return they'll have to go through a lot to get the guineas. My guineas sure do know how to take a chunk out of someone who they do not know especially during the night. They'll even softly peck at me to tell me to leave them alone when they're sleeping.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2014
  9. Outpost JWB

    Outpost JWB Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,455
    359
    228
    Mar 31, 2014
    Ohio
    Baby monitor is an awesome idea. I may have to use that one myself. Wanted to get a great Pyrenees, but we only have 3 acres. Not going to be good for that sort of dog. Do you raise guineas and chickens together? Or can you? They sound really cool.
     
  10. GuineaFowling

    GuineaFowling Chillin' With My Peeps

    561
    17
    101
    Oct 3, 2013
    Central California
    Raising chickens and guineas together is better than introducing them, otherwise the guineas will beat up the chickens or vice versa. Guineas are more rowdy and usually fuss with one another so you'll need about 6 guineas to make sure they dont start fussing with the chickens too much. They tend to pull out feathers. Thats why a friend of mine keeps the guineas with the turkeys rather than the chickens. I no longer have chickens. They were becoming a problem to my guineas when it was breeding season. Would not allow the guinea hens to have a proper clutch of eggs without mixing in a couple of their own and sometimes they would start brooding the eggs but the guinea hens would still be trying to lay more to complete the clutch. It was hectic, I had one loud leghorn screaming at the top of her lungs because the guinea kicked her off the nest to lay an egg. Of course my situation was like that because the two shared a coop (the coop was divided in the middle, guineas on one side and chickens on the other) and because the guinea hens are trained to roost, lay, and brood in the coop, whereas most people's guineas tend to lay in the pasture or somewhere but the coop.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by