Guineas and Silkie eggs in incubation

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Jessie22, Nov 7, 2016.

  1. Jessie22

    Jessie22 Chillin' With My Peeps

    My 10 guineas are 22 days old and have always been energetic. They started tearing up the saran wrap I had on their MHP. I fought with it for a few days and finally this morning removed heating pad and all. Last night they didn't even use it. My avatars on my profile is the latest picture of them. They have feathers and huddle on the limb and food tray at night. My question is their coop arrives Thursday and was wondering if they will need heat and what age should they go out.(the dust galore). At night it is 40 and day is mid 60's and dropping to 53 in 6 days and going back and fourth. The barn does have electricity but needs to be wired to my house and I plan on purchasing a Sweet Heater (11 X 40) made for chicken barns and coops.

    I also have 16 silkie eggs on incubation. Winter is not so good for incubation but the lady replaced the silkie eggs that were not fertile. Late at night the humidity drops to like 35 or less, Will this effect the silkie eggs? I immediately raise the humidity to 45 and that is how I am running the humidity. I kept my guineas at this level of humidity and had silkie eggs in with them and hatched 4 silkie out of 6 shipped eggs. The silkie eggs are on day 4.

    Any help is appreciated.

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  2. FoodFreedomNow

    FoodFreedomNow Chillin' With My Peeps

    I feel your pain - I have 9 week old chicks inside in a brooder at night and they're pooping up a storm and creating their own weather with the dust storms they create. [​IMG]

    In seriousness, it sounds like it's getting pretty chilly there, especially at night, so they will need a supplemental heat source at least until they're fully feathered (should be at around 6 weeks old) - this thread may help: https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/723497/when-can-i-put-the-keets-outside.

    Re your silkie eggs: humidity dropping to 35% likely won't be a problem - some people (including me) "dry hatch" chicken eggs, aiming for low relative humidity (35-40%) until lockdown. Here's more info: https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-to-incubate-hatch-eggs-using-the-dry-incubation-method.

    Good luck with transitioning your keets outside and your upcoming hatch!
     

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