Hackle feathers?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by marytoast, Feb 21, 2009.

  1. marytoast

    marytoast Chillin' With My Peeps

    783
    1
    141
    Dec 31, 2008
    Carthage, NC
    Where are hackle feathers and can you sex an ameracauna by them? [​IMG]
     
  2. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    Hackle feathers are around the neck....

    See here https://www.backyardchickens.com/LC-anatomy.html

    But
    some breeds the females can also have rather pointy and shiney hackles.... saddle feathers, I think, are the better way to know.

    They start to come in on the back about midway down and if it is a cockerel of around 3-5 months of age you should be able to see them coming in pointy.

    Here's a pic of some saddle feathers from my Ameraucanas....

    Pullet, slow developing cockerel, slow dev. cockerel, cockerel,and pullet.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. marytoast

    marytoast Chillin' With My Peeps

    783
    1
    141
    Dec 31, 2008
    Carthage, NC
    Thanks a buch! That was very helpful. I am just trying to sex my 3 wk. old ameracaunas. I think it is impossible [​IMG]
     
  4. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    At 3 weeks.. yes [​IMG] You're going to have to wait a bit longer... at least 8 weeks before the first real signs will start to come in. Are these true Ameraucana or Easter Eggers? My EEs were much quicker to show signs than my actual Ameraucanas.... I had 2 BBS Ameraucanas that were very slow in developing and still looked like pullets when the other cockerels were clearly cockerels. This was at 5-6 months of age. My EEs I could pretty much tell at about 8 weeks. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2009
  5. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
    119
    408
    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    When you were a kid did you ever hear the expression "don't get your hackle feathers up"?
    Once you see an adult rooster raise his hackles at a disobedient hen, you'll know where the expression came from. [​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by