Handling and temperament

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by moodlymoo, Oct 26, 2011.

  1. moodlymoo

    moodlymoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 23, 2011
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    I am worried I may have a little roo, would like to keep it but IF he is allowed to stay he must be nice. Will lots of handling help with this? If so I will have a chick living in my pocket. Seriously though, how can you make sure a roo will be nice. Its 5weeks old. Im not even sure its a roo...heck, I dont even know what breed it is

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  2. SteveBaz

    SteveBaz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lots of handling and love. Treats to bribe is fair game when it comes to conditioning. I feed them sitting down with legs straight out. I lock myself up in the coop with treats and hand feed them. Talk baby talk very low and quiet. Hands and actions very exaggerated slow so no quick moments to freak them out. The more I do this the more they are all over me like i belonged to them and in their little world which they see. I pet and love them in my lap and handle them with finger touches under their beak and on the head. I like to gently pull their wings out a bit to touch under the wings and body. They love the chest being touched and the back they freeze when I love them there. I think there feet are ticklish on a couple of my girls but they dont hop off me. I do it daily and go ahead and try to feel bad when you have these little baby creatures running around and on you. [​IMG] so cute!!
     
  3. moodlymoo

    moodlymoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 23, 2011
    Portland OR
    Quote:This helps for keeping ROO's nice?
     
  4. SteveBaz

    SteveBaz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Pacific North West
    Quote:This helps for keeping ROO's nice?

    Any regular time spent is time invested. It is conditioning. I would do this not only daily but at the same time each day so it becomes a thing for you and him. You will find he will come running for you at the exact time you enter after a few days. I have a bike bell I ring at the gate and when the girls hear it the are on the way. They know there is a treat that goes with the sound and come running. Pavlova Theory. I just posted another post similar. It works specially with food.
     
  5. Blue

    Blue Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 6, 2010
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    Handling may help, but rooster behavior also depends on genetics. If a rooster is the offspring of an aggressive rooster, then he is more likely to develop aggression himself. If the rooster was aggressive, but the hen was very tame, it could go either way. If both parents were very tame and friendly, then score! [​IMG] Having said that, handling the rooster won't hurt either. Your rooster may not be aggressive at all. Also, if your rooster starts pecking/biting you, he may be trying to assert himself as dominant to you. You don't want him to think he's the boss, so this is a habit you want to try and break before he matures.

    This year, I've been tapping the rooster on the head for biting/pecking me (like another chicken would peck them on the head). I had one persistent cockerel that just kept wanting to bite, though, so I gave him a close-up of the ground (I just made him squat on the ground (a submissive posture for chickens) and held him there for a couple minutes). Both of these things are ways that I'm trying to show the rooster that I'm in charge and are ways that chickens try to assert dominance over each other. There are lots of threads on the site on different ways people deal with aggressive roosters, but these are a couple of things you can do to help try and break any agression in young cockerels before it really starts.
     

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