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Hanukkah

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by chickenmum, Dec 13, 2008.

  1. chickenmum

    chickenmum Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 7, 2008
    Happy Hanukkah! It's not Hanukkah yet, but who else does Hanukkah? If you do, please send me a PM thingy, message.[​IMG]
     
  2. PotterWatch

    PotterWatch My Patronus is a Chicken

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    Apr 22, 2008
    Virginia
    We are having a Chanukah celebration at our house on the 18th. My boys and I thought it would be nice to share some of our traditions with our homeschooling friends, none of whom are practicing Jews. I thought perhaps we would have 4 or 5 families interested in coming to have sufganiyot, latkes, hear stories, and play dreidel. Apparently people are more interested than I thought they would be because we now have about 38 kids and 17 parents who are coming. Oy vey! Should be a fun celebration though. Happy Chanukah!
     
  3. LittleChickenRacingTeam

    LittleChickenRacingTeam On vacation

    Jan 11, 2007
    Ontario, CANADA
    Quote:No clue what hanukka is. Please explain the ritual.
     
  4. Robin'sBrood

    Robin'sBrood Flock Mistress

    May 8, 2008
    North Carolina
    Quote:Are you serious?
     
  5. LittleChickenRacingTeam

    LittleChickenRacingTeam On vacation

    Jan 11, 2007
    Ontario, CANADA
    Quote:Are you serious?

    Umm yeh. I was raised Catholic & now practice another religion.
     
  6. Robin'sBrood

    Robin'sBrood Flock Mistress

    May 8, 2008
    North Carolina
    Alrighty then... [​IMG]
     
  7. Sunny Side Up

    Sunny Side Up Count your many blessings...

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    Mar 12, 2008
    Loxahatchee, Florida
    We are Christians who also celebrate some of the Jewish holidays. We find them very meaningful, and especially enjoyable for the children. The traditions are interactive & multi-sensory, and therefore most memorable.

    My kids learned a lot about Hanukkah from watching a Shari Lewis/Lambchop video and we've patterned our celebration from a song they sang there. It's like The 12 Days of Christmas song but instead is about the 8 nights of Hanukkah. Each night we light our menorah and sing the prayers, then place it in our front window and walk out to the street to see its glow. While we're there we sing the Lambchop Hanukkah song, adding a new stanza each night. Then we go back inside, eat at least one piece of chocolate gelt, and do the activity for the night.

    According to the song:
    1st night: Light the shamash & another candle too
    2nd: Make potato latkes
    3rd: Play dreidel
    4th: Listen to the story of Hanukkah
    5th: Eat chocolate gelt
    6th: Dance the hora
    7th: Give presents
    8th: Gather with family/friends

    On the first night we sing the extra prayer thanking God for bringing us through another year. Afterwards, I like for us to take time to recount all the blessings we've received in the past year. Even if it seems like it's been a rough year, when we take this time to count blessings, it gives us a new & better perspective on life.

    Have a happy Hanukkah everyone! This year it begins next Sun night, Dec 21, as soon as it's dark enough to see 3 stars in the sky.
    [​IMG] L'chaim! [​IMG]
     
  8. curliet

    curliet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 22, 2008
    west Michigan
    Wow, if I was Jewish, I'd be shaking my head right now. You guys are too much.
     
  9. chickenmum

    chickenmum Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 7, 2008
    Isn't it ridiculous how expensive gelt is? Our Torah study club is going to have a celebration at a church in our town. Here's a song in which I kinda replaced the words:
    On the first night of Hanukkah my true love gave to me:
    And here are the words; I'm not going to type it all out; just the wordies:
    1st night: A llama named Emily
    2nd night: 2 dairy goats
    3rd night: 3 Mottled Cochins
    4th night: 4 Red Dorkings
    5th night: 5 1rst place trophies!
    6th night: 6 cute alpacies
    7th night: 7 Scots Dumpies
    8th night: 8 Japanese Bantams
     
  10. PotterWatch

    PotterWatch My Patronus is a Chicken

    5,470
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    Apr 22, 2008
    Virginia
    We don't celebrate Chanukah in a big way, it is after all, a minor holiday; but we do like to play dreidel, eat latkes and sufganiyot, and light our chanukiot. We do give gifts to the kids, but they are generally small things. They usually get some gelt the first night, a new dreidel the second night, new crayons, markers, or other art supplies, things like that.

    For those who don't know, here is an explaination of Chanukah (it can be spelled several different ways in English), taken from http://www.jewfaq.org :

    Chanukkah is the festival of lights, commemorating the rededication of the Temple in Jerusalem after a successful revolt against the Seleucid Greeks. As part of the rededication, the victorious Jews needed to light the Temple's menorah (candelabrum), but they had only enough oil to last one day and it would take eight days to prepare more oil. Miraculously, the one-day supply of oil lasted for eight days. The miracle of the oil is commemorated with this eight-day candlelighting holiday.

    Chanukkah begins between Thanksgiving and Christmas. About half of the time, it overlaps with Christmas, but there are many years when Chanukkah ends long before Christmas. In 2002, for example, Chanukkah began on Thanksgiving and ended in the first week of December, but that is unusual.

    Almost all Jews light candles with their families for at least some nights of the holiday, so people like to be at home during this holiday. Although almost nobody takes off from work or school for this holiday, many may not want to work nights or travel during the holiday so they can light candles with the family, and accommodations should be made for this.

    The most important thing to remember about Chanukkah is that it is not Jewish Christmas, no matter what the card shops and toy stores want you to believe. Chanukkah is a very minor holiday. It's not about joy to the world and peace on Earth and presents galore for everyone you've ever met; it's about lighting candles and playing games for chocolate coins and eating potato pancakes. Many Jewish parents give their children gifts during Chanukkah because they don't want their children to feel left out of Christmas, but Chanukkah gift-giving rarely extends much beyond one's own children.

    Most American Jews feel a sort of ambivalence about Chanukkah. On the one hand, most of them know that Chanukkah is not a big deal, and they don't want to make a big deal about it. On the other hand, Christmas is everywhere, unavoidable and overwhelming, and Jews want something of their own to counterbalance it. This is the primary motivation behind elaborate Chanukkah decorations and enormous Chanukkah menorahs in public areas: Chanukkah is not very important, but asserting our Jewish identity and distinctiveness and existence in the face of overwhelming pressure to conform to a non-Jewish norm is important. Pressuring Jews to conform to that norm or to participate in Christmas events if they don't want to is inconsiderate at best.
     

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