Hardy, friendly chickens recommendations...

PetitePlume

Chirping
Dec 20, 2017
50
69
71
Dawson City, Yukon
Hello all!
I was lucky last summer to be able to borrow 3 chickens. I loved them so much and I want to get my own now. I live in the central Yukon, Canada, so I need some hardy chickens of course. Good winter layers is a must since winter is long here. I'm thinking of having 6 all together.

I have to little daughters who love animals so I want some friendly chickens. I let them free when I am around, which is most of the time,worst case they get about 3 hours of free ranging.
I'm also looking for a rooster that could maybe help with protecting the hens, friendly one of course or he will end up on the table...

So if you have anything you would recommend I would love to know about it!

Thanks ahead!
 

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Oct 20, 2017
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Hi! :frow :welcome
Good winter layers, and that are very friendly, I believe, should be Buff Chanteclers, Speckled Sussexes, Salmon Faverolles (which are rather fluffy, too, and great pets), Barred Rocks, Rhode Island Reds, Black Australorps, Buff Orpingtons, Silver Gray Dorkings, possibly Dominiques, and plenty of others, I'm sure! :) That gives you a wide option to choose from.
As for the rooster, you should get a Welsummer roo, or maybe a Black Copper Marans rooster. I think I read some good things on those ones. I read that either Favorelle, Barred Rocks, and possibly Dorking roosters are friendly breeds, but I'm not sure how protective they are with their hens.
 

Chelseyb123

Songster
Oct 4, 2017
454
360
141
Maine
I have a 9month old Sussex and she just started layting the other day. I live in maine so its pretty cold right now an theres snow. Shes a very spunky girl she loves her picture taken and doesnt mined being held. Very hardy! I second the sussex an australorps great layers of big brown eggs and i hacted out three of there eggs. An also very hardy and have beautiful feathers when the light hits. Mine are blue an green. Good luck!
 

Mrs. K

Free Ranging
10 Years
Nov 12, 2009
7,320
7,086
536
western South Dakota
If you are just getting started and have two young daughters under the age of 5, I would strongly recommend no roosters until you all get some experience. Roosters have ruined the whole chicken experience for a lot of people.

Just get some chickens, don't worry too much on the breed, some will work out, some will not, some will be better than others for your own particular set up. Solve any problems for the peace of your flock. Try and go into this hobby with the idea of keeping a flock, not individual birds that will live for 9 years. I have kept a flock continuously now for 10 years. The birds come into it and go out of it.

Mrs K
 

lcwmt

Songster
Jun 16, 2017
387
874
214
N Central MT
We selected for cold hardiness and docile temperaments. 3 Buff Orpingtons and 2 EE. There's also a Banty, she layed well all Summer, molted in late October but she's cute <G>.Temps here yesterday were single digits with snow falling. Laying dropped off in early November when it got very cold, very fast. They still lay several eggs a week and one of the pullets layed her first two eggs this week.
 

lazy gardener

Crossing the Road
7 Years
Nov 7, 2012
27,610
26,708
907
CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
I would choose all birds with small combs. Some of my favorites: Dominique, EE, Buck Eye. I also like Silver Laced Wyandottes. You might like some Rose Comb Leghorns.

I also suggest that you put electricity in your coop so you can brood your chicks in the coop, and provide supplemental lighting, and a heated waterer. I'd not be successful with my flock if I did not have coop electrified!!
 

PetitePlume

Chirping
Dec 20, 2017
50
69
71
Dawson City, Yukon
Thanks to all of you for sharing your knowledge with me!
I would choose all birds with small combs. Some of my favorites: Dominique, EE, Buck Eye. I also like Silver Laced Wyandottes. You might like some Rose Comb Leghorns.

I also suggest that you put electricity in your coop so you can brood your chicks in the coop, and provide supplemental lighting, and a heated waterer. I'd not be successful with my flock if I did not have coop electrified!!
We live off the grid so the little power we have we keep it for ourselves... I was thinking of a coop half way into the ground, with a sod roof, will have to make sure it won't become a puddle in the spring or when it rains... Also a big pipe with a computer fan to push the heat from the wood stove towards to coop. Quite complicated I know, but I want chicken! Also considered leaving my dog in the coop for the cold night. May sound silly but she is big and chicken friendly... Still have a lot to figure out...

If you are just getting started and have two young daughters under the age of 5, I would strongly recommend no roosters until you all get some experience. Roosters have ruined the whole chicken experience for a lot of people.

Just get some chickens, don't worry too much on the breed, some will work out, some will not, some will be better than others for your own particular set up. Solve any problems for the peace of your flock. Try and go into this hobby with the idea of keeping a flock, not individual birds that will live for 9 years. I have kept a flock continuously now for 10 years. The birds come into it and go out of it.

I know this will be a tough one for us, our 3 chickens were part of the family so much last summer, except that they weren't allowed in the house ;)

Mrs K
It makes sens to skip the rooster for the girls. I'm not familiar with roosters because of there reputation but I did see a few that were fine with my daughters so I thought maybe some breed would be better than others.

Also I'm expecting my daughters to get pecked at once in a while, just like getting scratched by a cat... They are learning about respect and boundaries.

Keeping in mind those breeds and will do some more reading about them, it narrowed it down quite a bit, thank you!!!
 
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