Harvesting wood on own property?

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by seabreeze, Apr 12, 2011.

  1. seabreeze

    seabreeze Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 21, 2010
    Scio, OR
    We have two GINORMOUS trees that would help provide income since I've lost my source of income back in November and haven't been able to find new sources yet (still trying tho').

    One is a giant oak tree that would take at least 4 people to encircle the trunk and before yelling at me, it's humongous limbs are slowly crushing my small, old metal haybarn. I could try and take the limbs down but they are still too big for a non-professional to drop off the trunk of the tree.

    I would also like to use some of the wood for coops, small buildings etc as that would cut way down, on-going building expenses.

    But if I sold the wood instead, what would a pro logger charge (Oregon) to bring it down, and what could I expect for the over 8500 board-feet in the tree? Maybe even over 12,000 board feet counting the limbs which are fairly straight as well.

    The other tree is an ancient Lebanon cedar on the banks of the creek at back of property. I understand cedar is in high demand right now and it would be easier to fell because it has no structures in or around it.

    Any input on costs to fell, prices that may be gotten for super quality wood, thousands of board-feet worth?

    Thanks!
     
  2. mom'sfolly

    mom'sfolly Overrun With Chickens

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    Feb 15, 2007
    Austin area, Texas
    Check your local ordinances before you cut anything. Lots of places have restrictions on cutting old trees, even on private property. I know several people on here have looked into having their places logged, only to find that it would cost them money, not make money. I bet they'll chime in here and give you their advice.
     
  3. seabreeze

    seabreeze Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 21, 2010
    Scio, OR
    Thanks! I will check into it.
     
  4. joedie

    joedie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 17, 2009
    SW Indiana
    I called a Forester and he came over, marked the trees, figured out the board feet of each type and listed it for bids. He got a percentage of the earnings. BUT, I had 200 trees to drop. They don't take the limbs, straight or not. They make a big mess with the truck tires and leave all but the bottom trunk. I did make good money but have years of cutting up the leftovers. We heat with an outdoor woodburner so not a problem. They would only take it if it was a big enough job ie. so many trees.
     
  5. dacjohns

    dacjohns People Cracker Upper

    A good place to start is with your state forestry department. They should be able to steer you in the right direction. A big old oak tree with huge limbs might not have much in the way of marketable timber.
     
  6. seabreeze

    seabreeze Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 21, 2010
    Scio, OR
    Thanks Joedie, I don't have that many trees [​IMG]

    I will check Oregon's ordinances since this is a state where logging is a way of life; hopefully I will be allowed to pursue this.
     
  7. mchl

    mchl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 30, 2010
    Jodie your logger should have done better, any profesional logger cleans up after himself that is why he gets some of the money. You can get quotes and tell what you expect, good money in lumber go look at the lumber yard
     
  8. Teach97

    Teach97 Bantam Addict

    Nov 12, 2008
    Hooker, OK
    sounds to me likeyou would be looing more for speciality custom cutters of special wood...the large guys aren't going to want to work with small numbers but the little special guys are only going to want to mess with the best woods...

    Do you know of anyone with a saw mill? They make small ones folks use for just that sort of thing...they cost a bit but where they really make their money is selling replacement parts for folks that get into something that really requires some knowledge...father-in-law had a neighbor that cut trees...he stayed with pine because of its easy of cutting...great place to go and get true deminsional lumber. Oak isn't somethingyu want to learn on...hard wood dulls saws and such...
     
  9. treeman

    treeman Out Of The Brooder

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    definitely check the ordinances before you take any tree down.

    Also check with a small sawmill. They can sometimes accommodate 1-2 trees.

    I supply wood to a cabinet maker and some wood-turners. I work in an urban area, so recycling the wood is important rather than just cutting it into firewood. I also get a lot of hotshot BBQers that always want hickory, cherry, pecan, etc.
     
  10. seabreeze

    seabreeze Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 21, 2010
    Scio, OR
    Thank you everyone, I will first check with forestry dept. and then see if I can locate a specialty mill. I guess I will start with an ad on Craigs List. Thanks again for all the input and great ideas!
     

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