Has anyone build a cob constructed coop?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Sseckel, Jan 19, 2014.

  1. Sseckel

    Sseckel Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I currently have my girls in a temporary coop that I bought from Theisen's Farm Supply. It isn't holding up at all. Hasn't even been a year and the floor pan is cracked through and the nest box floor is severely rotted. I am currently designing a new more permanent coop and am interested in using cob construction methods. Cost is my biggest factor in this and it looks pretty darn easy, though time consuming. SO I am looking for input from anyone who has experience with this method or suggestions anyone else may have.
    My town only allows for 4 hens and the footprint of the coop to be no larger than 6'X8". The permit isn't clear on whether or not this includes the run in these dimensions. So I may get creative with that, not sure how much I want to push it though. Thank you!
     
  2. DeannaA

    DeannaA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have not build a cob coop but I have been looking into it. If cost is the only reason, I built my first one from a riding lawn mower crate. I went to several tractor stores until I found one that got their stuff in crates. I asked them to save onee for me. It's about 5'x7'x4'. I painted it with oops paint. I had 8 in there. I built a new one because I have over 50 now but I am going to use it as an outside brooder.
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  3. OScarlet

    OScarlet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    won't the cob walls take up a bunch of interior space?
     
  4. Sseckel

    Sseckel Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Cost isn't the only factor though it is very appealing. My permit requires that we cannot use recycled materials (don't even get me started on how ridiculous this ordinance is). So I turned to cob as something that is earth friendly and would allow for a different kind of creativity than wood. I am wanting to do something resembling a hobbit house and with the curves involved with that I don't want the headache of working with the angles of wood (other than the roof).
    As for the thickness of the walls taking up interior space the permit states the coop can have no more than 48sq ft of interior space. So I am not worried about the thickness of walls as the actual footprint of the coop can be larger than the 6x8'. Plus I only can have up to 4 hens, so 6x8 is pretty good size for that.
    I also planned to build this on top of an old sand pile so it will have excellent drainage from the base. I was wondering if witht eh sand base I still need to have a rock base at the standard height or if it can be a bit lower ( the sand pit is still elevated about 10" above the rest of the ground and is at the top of a hill).
     
  5. DeannaA

    DeannaA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My chickens have bathed away a lot of dirt in my backyard. I don't no where it has gone. They looove sand. They dust in it and create large holes. Here are a few thinds I have found.

    http://www.cobbuildingwithmaya.com/

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  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Great solution if limits are on interior space!

    My daughter builds with cob, it's a very interesting medium...allows for much creativity.
    It is not impervious to water tho, hopefully your climate is dry or build big overhangs on your roof to protect the walls and be ready to maintain them.
     

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