Has anyone in the Midwest used 'Cedar Chicken Coop' for their coops?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by beckyrasdf, Dec 15, 2014.

  1. beckyrasdf

    beckyrasdf Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 12, 2014
    We're thinking about buying a chicken cool since we dont have time to build one. We found Cedar Chicken Coop (located in Wisconsin) and I wanted to know if anyone's had good experience with them. Their website is cedarchickencoop.com.
    We would buy the mid-sized coop. It's moveable and able to be winterized...it seems really well thought out. But we've never had chickens before and are going on book knowdge only [​IMG]. Any insight would be much appreciated!!
     
  2. Trefoil

    Trefoil Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have no experience with these coops. They are very expensive for what you are getting. The actual "coop" in the 5 x 8 is going to be a little smaller that 3 x 5. And will comfortable hold maybe 3-5 standard chickens. Before use you will have to put hardware cloth on the bottom so predators can't get in. I can't tell and couldn't find where it tells what wire they are using, but if its chicken wire, it will be useless. Are you planning to free range your chickens? This time of year lowes,home depot, and other big stores are probably selling their model sheds at clearance. They are already built and you might look into one of those.
     
  3. beckyrasdf

    beckyrasdf Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for your reply! We have a yard with a privacy fence - chickens will be free range as much as possible throughout the day. I don't see us really ever having more than 4-5 hens since we're only wanting eggs for the family and pets :) The idea of a moveable coop is very appealing - I'd prefer not having a permanent structure in the backyard and I also want to keep the lawn as decent looking as possible. You've given me lots to think about - thanks so much!!
     
  4. Trefoil

    Trefoil Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Something to think about. By having a wire floor on the run, it will allow your chickens to eat the plants and insects without destroying their roots and causing bare spots. Then by moving it around your yard the grass will get fertilized and "mowed" at the same time.
     
  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    I watched the video.....
    ......and I must say it does have a better nest/roost design than most of the prefab coops I've seen.

    The whole thing looks pretty solid...it has good cleaning access, nice handle storage, wheels look pretty good too.

    It's still awfully small, I wouldn't put more than 3 birds in there.
    You can free range but if you have weather issues (very cold, snow, high wind) they are going to spend the day inside the coop.

    Not enough ventilation, he hasn't a clue about ventilation.....
    .....but you could modify that by cutting some more holes and cover them with 1/2" Hardware Cloth.


    Nice looking and well placed latches tho not raccoon proof.....
    .....but you could modify that by installing better latches with loops and snap rings or caribineers.


    Chicken wire useless against predators.....
    ......... but you could modify that by replacing all the chicken wire with 1/2" Hardware Cloth.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2014
  6. beckyrasdf

    beckyrasdf Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks so much for your thorough reply! I noticed the chicken wire and thought too that it'd need to be replaced with something stronger. If we do go this route next year, he may be able to build it with that in the first place. But even if we don't go through him, at least we know what to look for now[​IMG] And thank also for your thoughts on the size! It seems like every pre-made coop is way too liberal on the # of chickens it should actually hold!

    A question I have for you, as we're thinking through design: how important do you think the winter kit is? I noticed most coops out there don't have that kind of option and wanted to know how necessary they typically are. If we're getting cold hardy birds, is it worth the hassle of boarding up the coop like that (since you've seen the video)?
     
  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Ventilation is most important all year round(read the article in blue text in my signature) but may be even more important in winter when the birds spent more time in the coop due to the longer nights and even during some days during extreme adverse weather. You need lots of ventilation but must guard against any strong drafts on the roost area especially, that seems contradictory but it's not really. Air movement is good if it's slow moving. If your birds feathers are ruffled(literally) by a strong draft, it disturbs the insulative effect of the feathers to keep the bird warm.

    How you provide ventilation is highly dependent on your climate, the prevailing winds on your site in relation to where the coop is located and the configuration of your coop structure. One of the main reasons to go big and tall when building a coop is it's easier to ventilate without strong drafts on the birds than with a tiny coop.

    The winter kit on that coop is nice(I stopped watching at that point), and may be good in your area to provide a wind break in the run area, but.... that material is expensive stuff(I think he said acrylic/Plexiglass is a brand name..which IS stronger than regular window glass but can still shatter in cold weather and is easily scratched....poly carbonate would be a better choice but is even more expensive) and it could probably be done DIY in a much more economic fashion.
     

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