Has anyone used a pneumatic egg washer?? Do they work??

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by daze333, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. daze333

    daze333 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 26, 2008
    Port Angeles, WA
    I get 2-4 dozen eggs a day and ti takes a long time to hand wash/scrub them. I know sometimes there is just not a better way to do things. Is this one of them? Is there an egg washer out there that works and doesn't cost an arm and a leg?

    Here is the one I am looking at buying. http://www.wellingtonfamilyfarm.com/product/pneumatic-egg-washer/
    I would probably use warm water, not hot. And maybe a little vinegar for killing bacteria? Does that effect shell density?
    If you have any feedback on this I would really appreciate it!

    Thank you!
    Sherry
     
  2. howfunkyisurchicken

    howfunkyisurchicken Overrun With Chickens

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    Why do you need to scrub the eggs? Are you selling them to a store or are they just really dirty?
    If its a dirt issue, clean out the nest boxes (don't let them sleep there, provide hay/shavings on floor to help with dirty feet, ect). I don't wash my eggs at all, and if they do get a poo or dirt smear a quick rinse before I use them solves the problem...
    Nikki
     
  3. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I also wonder why you're scrubbing your eggs? And worried about bacteria on the outside? I store my unwashed eggs on the counter up to a month and have no problems. If an egg is setting in poop, I do wash is off, but just regular eggs? Nah. I've got other things to do with my time!
     
  4. daze333

    daze333 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 26, 2008
    Port Angeles, WA
    I sell eggs to customers and I wash them all. I live in the NW and it is very muddy here for most of the year. They mostly have light smears of mud, once in a while they will break an egg and get yolk all over that dries and is hard to clean. The ducks live in mud and their eggs are muddy no matter what. I do change the nesting boxes and bedding regularly, but the mud comes in on their feet when they get in the box. I just wash with warm water to get the gunk off. I am not worried about bacteria, I think it would be off-putting to my customers to have muddy eggs with feathers and straw stuck to them. I get a lot of eggs and between taking care of all these animals and home schooling my kids and providing for my family, any time savers are worth it to me! Thanks for your input.
     
  5. florchica

    florchica Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 23, 2011
    Independence, OR
    I'd really like feedback on this too. Also in the PNW I can second that mud is a way of life and since we sell eggs we need them looking good for customers. There is someone on Craigslist sort of nearby that makes the washers, the video looks convincing but I'd like to hear from others who aren't benefiting from the sales on whether they really like it or not. If curious, the Craigslist ad can be found at http://eugene.craigslist.org/grq/3635509293.html.
     
  6. daze333

    daze333 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 26, 2008
    Port Angeles, WA
    Yes, that is exactly where I was looking to buy one, and exactly what I was wondering too.
     
  7. jwell

    jwell New Egg

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    Jul 24, 2012
    Eugene, OR
    We use these on our small farm and felt others could too. We've only sold locally until a few weeks ago, we recently expanded our advertising to Washington. Included with each order is instructions and if your not satisfied can return the unit within 30 days. Our eggs were being advertised on craiglist and quickly learned that eggs needed to be washed in order to meet regulations. We've found this method to be the most efficient and effective.

    James Wellington
    www.wellingtonfamilyfarm.com
     
  8. daze333

    daze333 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 26, 2008
    Port Angeles, WA
    James, thanks for the info. Does it get off that dried egg yolk? Do you sell them as well?
     
  9. jwell

    jwell New Egg

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    Jul 24, 2012
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    We don't have a problem with breakage, we use hay in the nesting boxes and supplement with oyster shells. I've had a few eggs without shells and the adjacent eggs came out clean that had a little egg white, possible yolk on them. Does it remove 95% of feathers, mud, poo, yes. Occasionally I've had to gently rub a few eggs prior to removing theme to get off the last bit of extremely tough grime, dried yolks might fall into this category. We use a half ounce of apple cider vinegar in the water for a more natural "cleaning solution".

    I made this product for my wife and I to help with our busy schedules, we wash about four to six dozen at a time. I felt it added value and others could benefit from it so I began advertising them on craiglist and added them to our website. I'm the one that created the advertisement that sparked your curiosity. We've sold about five in the last month, all customer seem happy, haven't received any reviews from them yet though.
     
  10. jacklinz

    jacklinz New Egg

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    Jan 31, 2012
    i am in KY and we have much mud also. i have a pen that the ducks stay in at night, and out during the day. i have put down rock fabric as a base and limestone sand (or you could use regular sand) on top. this keeps the fabric onthe ground and the sand keeps the eggs so much cleaner. i use an egg cleaner just because i resell them but i only get 16/day, so i do 2 days worth at a time.

    don't know what your area is like but if they can go outside, have a swim in a pool or something they will get cleaner when they go back in. the sand is also a drying thing. one thing i am finding with my situation, it would be good to have it semi level. our rain level here has washed the sand down the hill a little. but the eggs are clean. they find a spot of mud that is not covered and lay in that sometimes, but over all, they are much cleaner when they come out in the morning, the eggs are cleaner.

    i am looking at the egg bubbler thing but i just don't see it. i have the hot water and cleaner in a 1 gallon contaner, add the eggs which amounts to about 2 dozen, then let them sit, a few minutes, take them out and rinse what is on them off then lay them on a paper towel to dry and coat them with food grade mineral oil. that seals the egg from contaminants and the egg wash i use disinfects them.

    if i bought a washer for the money i guess i would get the bubbler but still you would have to handle all the eggs at one point or other. if their is poo on them you still have to scrub it off. kinda like a dishwasher sometimes does not get it all.

    i sell my eggs to people and i want to inspect every egg, make sure it is clean and set up for long storage. so i do mine all by hand. it is not that big a deal i do it when i am cooking breakfast. takes about 10 minutes to complete.
    that includes getting stuff out, setting up, washing, rinsing, inspection, drying, coating, and packing.

    swimming pools help and if you had the rock fabric and some sand, it would make life so much better for you and the ducks.
     

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