Hatched egg shell

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by mommybugv, Jun 12, 2016.

  1. mommybugv

    mommybugv New Egg

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    Jun 9, 2016
    I have six duck eggs. Two hatched about six hours ago. Three have pipped...break in the shell seen from the outside. One still has veins but has not entered the air cell yet. The two that hatched both had a little bit of yellowish brown gel like liquid left at the bottom of their shell after hatching. This is my first hatch ever so I'm not sure if it may be part of the yolk. Both duckling are drying nicely and have been moving around chirping. They seem to look healthy to me. I just want to make sure that liquid is normal? And could this possibly have any effect on the eggs that are left?
     
  2. perchie.girl

    perchie.girl Desert Dweller Premium Member

    first of all [​IMG]

    I believe its normal Not a hatching expert though. But I have listened to others talk about having to clean the mess hatching makes of the incubator..... I am certain someone with real experience will chime in.

    deb
     
  3. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    [​IMG] Yes, that is "normal". The girls and I on the hands on thread were discussing this one day. According to one of them the gel ish substance has been happening more and more over the last couple years with her eggs and throughout the duck hatching community. As long as the ducklings are healthy and acting right, I wouldn't worry.
     
  4. mommybugv

    mommybugv New Egg

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    Jun 9, 2016
    Thank you...they seem to be doing great. The (3) of them have pipped and working their way out but the last one has no internal or external pip. It is still moving but weaker and weaker it sounds like his pecking is coming from the pointy part of the egg. Is there anything I can do to help it?
     
  5. perchie.girl

    perchie.girl Desert Dweller Premium Member

    talk to @Sally Sunshine shes a master with egg hatching and assisted hatching.... My mentioning her here with the @ symbol will alert her but click on her name here and it will take you to her page and you will find the articles she has written.

    deb
     
  6. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    There's not much you can do for an unpipped egg. I am very hands on, and I still won't go into an unpipped egg because the risk of causing damage is greater than the probability of helping.
     
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  7. SunHwaKwon

    SunHwaKwon Overrun With Chickens

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    I have had to "pip" some guinea eggs... As recent as today in fact. Some of the eggs have been incredibly hard and thick for some reason. The safest seeming method I have developed is using a very small electronics screwdriver and file away rather than chipping at a point after candling to find a spot in the aircell not visibly right near the chick. Once you file through to a very small point, carefully and slowly pry up and a piece of shell will break off. Do it slow so it doesn't pull even the outer membrane. Then I have to "zip" it to the beak and evaluate from there. I am having MAJOR humidity issues though, so coupled with the thick shells I've had to be a poultry midwife for this last hatch.

    I don't recommend this unless you have very steady hands, patience, know how to not jump the gun, and know when to back off. I don't know how ducks eggs compare in thickness.
     
  8. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    But you are talking about an egg that has internally pipped right?
     
  9. SunHwaKwon

    SunHwaKwon Overrun With Chickens

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    Oh yeah definitely. Only after they have been internally pipped for a good day or so and I can tell they are struggling with the shell, whether because it's too hard or they can't get good leverage due to positioning, a tight membrane, or being a little big.

    Rereading the post though, if the pecking is at the pointy end it would not be able to internally pip, or if it could Pierce the inner membrane you wouldn't be able to tell. So that would be a personal decision to make regarding helping out not.

    My approach would be to follow break the shell as I've already described (at the air cell end) and pip it lengthwise to get to the beak. Remove a small bit of outer membrane and evaluate the veining on the inner membrane. If they are full of blood, you can carefully make an airhole if there is room, wet the membrane well, and put it back in the incubator. Make sure your humidity is up so you don't shrink wrap them, and make sure the nostrils are clear of membrane. Check back every hour or so to make sure the membrane isn't right and to see if the blood had receded.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2016

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