Hatcheries and the month they start shipping?

Bullitt

Crowing
Jan 16, 2012
2,380
425
251
Texas
I see that some of the large hatcheries start shipping this month, December, and others are starting in January or February for the year. Then they often stop shipping around September or so.

Why do they have different schedules?

I would think it would be safer to start shipping maybe in February when it starts warming up a little bit, because they ship all over the United States and maybe Canada.
 

Acre4Me

Crowing
Nov 12, 2017
3,250
6,801
497
Western Ohio
I see that some of the large hatcheries start shipping this month, December, and others are starting in January or February for the year. Then they often stop shipping around September or so.

Why do they have different schedules?

I would think it would be safer to start shipping maybe in February when it starts warming up a little bit, because they ship all over the United States and maybe Canada.
There is always the express option for shipping chicks fairly fast, so the shipping stress is limited, and dome are shipping from not quite so cold areas. Some add heat packs in with the chicks.

some hatcheries don’t have much to offer late fall bc that is the time for molt and for selecting breeders for the next year, and switching up their pens. Also, birds are molting, no eggs. In addition, they may use the late fall/early winter time to feed special feeds for greater hatching success/healthy chicks.
 

NatJ

Songster
Mar 20, 2017
309
698
146
USA
I assume different hatcheries have different schedules because of what climate they're in, and what time of year they replace their breeder flocks or wait for them to molt.

I've noticed a number of hatcheries that ship common breeds all year long (McMurray Hatchery and Ideal Poultry, for example), ut the rarer breeds are typically available for a shorter season, mostly spring/summer.

I'm think more people buy chickens in the spring and summer than in the fall and winter, so the hatcheries offer the most breeds at the time of the biggest demand.

The local feed stores tend to have chicks in stock mostly in the spring, too.

Also, most chickens lay eggs in spring/summer, but many stop in the fall/winter--so it's easier to produce chicks at the same time that more people want them, and the low-demand season lines up nicely with the low-egg season.
 

Bullitt

Crowing
Jan 16, 2012
2,380
425
251
Texas
I assume different hatcheries have different schedules because of what climate they're in, and what time of year they replace their breeder flocks or wait for them to molt.

I've noticed a number of hatcheries that ship common breeds all year long (McMurray Hatchery and Ideal Poultry, for example), ut the rarer breeds are typically available for a shorter season, mostly spring/summer.

I'm think more people buy chickens in the spring and summer than in the fall and winter, so the hatcheries offer the most breeds at the time of the biggest demand.

The local feed stores tend to have chicks in stock mostly in the spring, too.

Also, most chickens lay eggs in spring/summer, but many stop in the fall/winter--so it's easier to produce chicks at the same time that more people want them, and the low-demand season lines up nicely with the low-egg season.

Most of that is true. But I see hatcheries that have a similar climate start shipping in different months. Hatcheries also ship all over the country, so no matter where a hatchery is located the chicks can be exposed to different temperatures.

You are right that some hatcheries also sell common breeds all year.

I suppose shipping times come down to the preference of those who run each hatchery. Whatever it is, the hatcheries really get busy with the start of a new year.

I was just a little surprised to see a hatchery really start shipping in December or January.
 
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