Hatching Crisis

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by therabbitperson, Mar 23, 2017.

  1. therabbitperson

    therabbitperson New Egg

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    Sep 13, 2015
    Hello all,

    This is our first incubator hatch, since our hens don't go broody anymore. We have a clutch of about 20 eggs in the incubator, some vary by a couple days age-wise, and last night 5 started pipping (on the 20th day). We left them alone, the humidity was only ~70% but we didn't want to disturb them - but today all but one has died! They managed to crack open parts of their shells, but only one so far seems okay.

    What do I do!? I can't just continue letting these little babies die and not try to help.

    Some seem to have a bloody/yolky film on them, does this mean anything?

    I can post pics of that would help.
     
  2. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Do you have your vents open? What was your humidity for the first 17 days?
     
  3. therabbitperson

    therabbitperson New Egg

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    Sep 13, 2015
    It was kept between 60-80%
     
  4. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    It was between 60-80% during the first 17 days? Are you in a high elevation?
     
  5. Bryam

    Bryam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Your humidity is too high, they drowned.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2017
  6. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    What kind of incubator do you have?
     
  7. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    If you ran humidity that high during the first 17 days, almost certainly the eggs didn't loose the moisture and they are drowning after making the pip. If you have room in the incubator, I would suggest cutting down egg cartons and putting the remainder of the eggs in the cartons so the are upright and hopefully gravity will help keep the excess fluid from drowning them. I would even go as far as when they pip clearing the pip hole and making sure the beak is at the hole and clear.
    I'm going to give you a humidity link to help you with that in the future: http://letsraisechickens.weebly.com...anuals-understanding-and-controlling-humidity
     
  8. therabbitperson

    therabbitperson New Egg

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    Sep 13, 2015
    That was the humidity our neighbors recommended, I'll check the brand.

    We hand turned them, would that make a difference?
     
  9. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    No, I hand turn mine. I prefer hand turning.

    That is way too high under normal conditions for the first 17 days, especially if you are not in a high elevation. I don't know too many people that have successful hatches at 50% much less above 60%. I'd start there for changes.

    ETA that slimy yellowish film that is covering them, is another sign of too high humidity. Malpositioned, overly large chicks, mushy chicks...all signs of too high humidity.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2017

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