Hatching duck eggs

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Ashleyy_x3, May 12, 2011.

  1. Ashleyy_x3

    Ashleyy_x3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So ive ALWAYS wanted to hatch some some little duckies, but i havent yett, only chickens so far. My question is, what are the friendliest breeds of ducks? I want duckies that will follow me around and be sweet :) alsoo, can you freshen me up on anything i need to know about hatching/raising them? i've researched it before, but I want to hear it from actual real-life experienced people [​IMG] thanks a bunch! Oh and also, anyone in Maine or in the New England area have any duck eggs that they ship? [​IMG]
     
  2. AdamD77

    AdamD77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, people always ask what breeds are friendly but the real answer is they all are, and they all aren't! It depends how you raise them!

    1. The more you raise at one time, the less friendly they'll be. They'll be more imprinted on their brothers and sisters and less on you. For example my own ducks - we got my two boys on their own and they're really friendly, in fact at the moment they are too friendly and won't leave me alone! My four girls we got a year later and although they're pretty good, they're not like the boys.

    2. The earlier on in their lives that you get them, the friendlier they'll be. If you get ducklings at a few days old, they'll have a lot longer to get used to you and may still imprint on you a bit. If you hatch them yourself it's even better because they will imprint on you! If you get teens or adults, they may take some time to get used to you, though then point 3 comes into play:

    3. The more time you spend with them, the more friendly they'll be. This doesn't need much explaining really! If you spend lots of time with them, get them to eat from your hand and get used to being picked up etc, they should be good ducks [​IMG]

    So although breed may possibly have a tiny part to play in friendliness (e.g. runners are always said to be skittish and wary, but all mine are runners and like I said the boys are very friendly!), it all really relies on their upbringing. I would say, choose a breed you want for whatever reason (nice colours, egg production, size etc) and then apply the three points I mentioned to it and you should have friendly, happy ducks [​IMG]
     
  3. mandelyn

    mandelyn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    x's 2.

    Though, out of the older ducklings I was given, the Khaki Campbell was a lot more open to the idea of being held.

    My "first born" Pekin x Mallard is the friendliest, because I hung out with it for 4 days waiting on it's buddies to hatch. My eggs were staggered, so it was like Christmas everyday that week. LOL But that one will come to me and the rest follow it since as the first one, it's also leader duck.

    My little Saxony was getting picked on, so I caged it inside the brooder where everyone could see it and hear it but not pick at it. I held it a lot, but since it's been put with the rest now, it's not as friendly as it was. But they all know my voice and respond to it.

    It's been real easy to get them all worked up so I can force a quack from someone so I can figure out gender. I go out there all excited and say "Duck, duck, duck, What are you duckies doing?" and they start chattering away and follow the oldest towards me. SO CUTE!
     
  4. Ashleyy_x3

    Ashleyy_x3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    does the sex of a duck have any influence over the temperment of it? like, are males or females typically more friendly than one or the other?
     
  5. agregg15

    agregg15 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I've noticed that my drakes are much calmer than my girls.
     
  6. AdamD77

    AdamD77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hmm, again it varies really [​IMG]

    You may have an over-protective male who doesn't like you going near his females, or a broody female who gets mad if you go near her when she's sitting on the nest, or, like I am having at the moment, you may find that with friendly males they may become too friendly and want to mate with you (even though they have 4 girls!) and end up biting you or fighting with each other! They calm right down after the breeding season ends though and go back to being cuties again [​IMG]
     
  7. Ashleyy_x3

    Ashleyy_x3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    what would be an ideal number of ducks to have, to have them be friendly and socialized with me, but also not terribly alone. i figure one lone ducky would probably be sad and lonely right? i dont want a whole bunch of ducks haha. would 2 be enough to keep eachother company? and would they still bond with me or would they be more into bonding with eachother? do males not get along with other males? oh andd which duck breeds can fly and which cant? i think i want some that cant fly..
     
  8. Ashleyy_x3

    Ashleyy_x3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    OH andd will ducks me more bonded to you if you hatch them out yourselves, or would they still be just as bonded if you were to purchase them as day old ducklings?
     
  9. AdamD77

    AdamD77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wow, that's a lot of questions [​IMG]

    What would be an ideal number of ducks to have, to have them be friendly and socialized with me, but also not terribly alone?

    I would say 2 or 3 is a good number. That will give them company when you're not around but is also few enough for them to bond with you too [​IMG]

    Do males get along with other males?

    Ducks are a lot better than chickens in this aspect - males should be happy to live together without females. Obviously you're not going to get any eggs, but on the plus side they are a lot quieter. You may find that in the breeding season all those hormones may make them a bit fiestier and more likely to fight, but that should only be for a few months of the year [​IMG]

    Which duck breeds can fly and which can't?

    The majority can't fly. The smaller, bantam breeds like Black East Indies, Calls, Mini Silver Appleyards and of course Mallards can fly along with Muscovies. Apart from these you shouldn't need to worry too much, and if they're friendly and bonded with you, they shouldn't want to leave anyway! [​IMG]

    Will ducks be more bonded to you if you hatch them out yourselves, or would they still be just as bonded if you were to purchase them as day old ducklings?

    Well, if you hatch them they'll imprint on you over the first few days of their lives, so getting day olds will still allow this process to happen, just minus that first day or two. As long as you put in the effort to spend lots of time with them they should be pretty bonded to you.
     
  10. animalpro24

    animalpro24 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Runners cannot fly , lots of people wonder if they can swim and yes they can. anyway it's hard to figure out a good way to get you birds used to people, three would be a good number if your not looking for a bigger group, i always worried about what if one duck dies when i have two then i have one lonely duck, so 3 would probably be best. one duck would be hard if you don't already have other ducks because it will get really attached to the owner but when the owner leaves or something like that it will become lonely and more needy. Don't know if this helps. anybody correct me if i am wrong.
     

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