Hatching eggs with brood

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Hazzard, Apr 1, 2015.

  1. Hazzard

    Hazzard Out Of The Brooder

    14
    1
    24
    Sep 14, 2014
    Oxfordshire
    As many of you know, Easter is coming up, and we would like to hatch some eggs, only we don't have the right equipment and we were thinking that if we put a sterilised egg inside, a hen would sit on it, which it would!

    The only problem, is that we don't have a broody hen, and we were wondering if there was any way possible to possible 'make' a hen go broody (I know it sounds cruel), or how do you get a broody hen!

    If you can't, then what do you recommend to start hatching with (something basic!)

    Thank you very much for looking at this!!

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  2. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

    19,591
    7,604
    546
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE
    You can't make a hen go broody. And as far as sterilizing an egg, you're better to leave the bloom on it if you intend to hatch it. You have 2 choices: Buy or build an incubator. They're not hard to build, you can get most of the supplies for free. You'll need a cooler or foam box, a computer fan, a Thermostat (check out the STC 1000), 2 light sockets, 2 40W bulbs, a 12 volt converter (think charger for a cell phone), a couple of pieces of glass, some duct tape, and some silicone calk, and some miscellaneous tools and electrical supplies. If you are comfortable wiring a lamp, you can make an incubator. Next, you need the "know how". Look for some excellent step by step videos by "Rush Lane Poultry". Then, most important of all, you need a calibrated thermometer, and the knowledge to complete the process of incubation: Read "Hatching 101" in the learning center. Read every article there. Then, after you've read it all, and have your incubator, there are lots of folks who will talk you through the process!
     
  3. Hazzard

    Hazzard Out Of The Brooder

    14
    1
    24
    Sep 14, 2014
    Oxfordshire
    Lazy gardener thank you so much for your information! Unfortunately, I am not so good or keen on building electrical appliances! Are there any good cheap hatchets on the market?

    Also, you said hens can't go broody, so are broody hens broody by blood?

    Finally, what is the 'bloom' on the egg?

    Thanks
     
  4. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

    19,591
    7,604
    546
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE
    Oh, Hazzard! I can't resist a good typo! You leave me no choice but to have fun with it! We've been using the same hatchet to split our kindling for years. I don't know what the going price is, but be sure you buy good quality when you do. As far as good incubators/hatchers, I made mine b/c I'm too cheap to do otherwise. I'm sure someone can advise!

    I said, you can't MAKE a hen go broody. Broodiness is hormonally driven, with some breeds being more prone to broodiness than others. But, it's all dependent on each bird. Some birds that are not inclined to go broody because of their breed, do go broody, while some birds of a breed well known for broodiness, never go broody. If you want a broody hen, you might get a silkie, or any other of the breeds well known for broodiness, and you will probably luck out.

    The bloom is the lubrication that you see on an egg the minute it exits the hen's vent. It dries quickly, and unless you actually see the egg being laid, you'll not likely see it. It has anti-bacterial properties to it. Sometimes, when you get an egg out of the nest, you may notice that it has some bits of hay or shavings stuck to it. They got stuck there by the bloom.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by