Hatching own chicks but what about vaccinating?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by ScoobyRoo, Jan 21, 2009.

  1. ScoobyRoo

    ScoobyRoo Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 21, 2008
    Land of OZ
    Those of you that hatch out your own chicks do you vaccinate yourself or do you not worry about it? Meaning the Marek's disease and the Coccidiosis. Never hatched out eggs but might try for the fun of it. Now, if I can just find a sticky telling me what the chance of producing from a BO rooster with these hens, LH, AUSt, LW, RIR and EE'S
     
  2. Chickenaddict

    Chickenaddict Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 19, 2008
    East Bethel MN
    I have never vaccinated chicks that are hatched here nor do i feed them medicated feed, I have never had one batch of chicks i have hatched get sick.
     
  3. CovenantCreek

    CovenantCreek Chicks Rule!

    Oct 19, 2007
    Franklin, TN
    So far I've only raised one batch of chicks -- no shots, no medicated feed, they're doing fine over a year later. The chicks I have now aren't being introduced to any medications either.
     
  4. MandyH

    MandyH You'll shoot your eye out!

    Never vaccinated nor fed medicated feed. I have hatched thousands of chicks over the last couple of years and have never lost one after it hatched except for them getting squished in the brooder. They need to build up their immune system. Now this is just MY opinion, and there are others who will not agree.
     
  5. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    I dont vaccinate. I dont think it is necessary. I do, however, feed medicated feed. This fall was the first time I didnt feed my chicks medicated feed, and they got coccidia. So I got the coccidia medicine, and they were fine. But I will now only feed the medicated food.
     
  6. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    I also don't vaccinate. However, I do feed medicated feed. I've gotten away with out it, and they do fine if exposed early, but cocci is a very high risk in our soils because it is damp year round which is perfect for the protozoa to survive. Warm damp humid areas can be even worse with cocci. Living in the middle of arizona... it might not be so big of a deal. Often they can build up a great immune system without medicated feeds, just give them early access to soil, like within the first week, so they can build immunity up. The med for cocci just prevents the protozoa from reproducing, so it isn't actively killing anything. That means if cocci is so high in your soil, they can still get it.

    As for mericks. It isn't really a risk here so I don't do that one either. If your flock has a history, or if the area you are in has a high risk, then it can be a good idea. Different places, different ways really.
     
  7. campbellhatchery

    campbellhatchery Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 20, 2009
    Carrollton, Ga
    Henry'schickens :

    Those of you that hatch out your own chicks do you vaccinate yourself or do you not worry about it? Meaning the Marek's disease and the Coccidiosis. Never hatched out eggs but might try for the fun of it. Now, if I can just find a sticky telling me what the chance of producing from a BO rooster with these hens, LH, AUSt, LW, RIR and EE'S

    Unless you have immediate neighbors with poultry, or you visit poultry shows you shouldn't need vaccinations. No need to feed them medicated feed either - if they look like they don't feel good just get them some general antibiotic from your feed supply store.

    Just make sure if you ever go anywhere which has poultry to wash your and and change your clothes before coming in contact with your chickens.

    If you do want to vaccinate you own chickens its best to do it their first day of life.

    Snipped this from a vet site:

    Marek's Disease Vaccine
    Marek's disease is a severe, debilitating viral illness of chickens. Birds with this disease frequently develop paralysis of one or both legs, their wings may droop, and they become very thin. The internal organs may develop tumors. In an affected flock, only a small percentage show typical symptoms and die. The majority of the infected birds shed virus for life. These virus-shedding birds are outwardly normal. When a shedder is introduced to a farm where the disease has never occurred before, high death losses may be seen. Once a farm has become contaminated with this virus, it is for all practical purposes, contaminated forever. In general, broiler chickens have less problems from Marek's disease than birds such as layers, or show birds, which tend to be kept around longer.

    The good news is that the vaccines for Marek's disease are highly effective if vaccination is done correctly. It is best to order chicks already vaccinated at the hatchery. If this cannot be done, be sure to vaccinate all new birds the first day they arrive on the farm. The vaccine is not very effective if a bird has already been exposed to the disease for more than a few days.

    The vaccine comes frozen in 1,000 dose vials. It is administered under the skin, at the back of the neck. Package instructions must be followed exactly in order for vaccination to be successful.



    The fact that you'd have to pay for 1,000 doses may make you consider weather or not it would be worth it. They charge 10 cents at a commercial hatchery, which means they have 2-5 cents per dose in it most likely or between 20-50 bucks. If anyone has some prices (its against forum policy to advertise other websites, just a price would help tho). Please reply.​
     

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