hatching shipped eggs turning

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by joe17, May 22, 2010.

  1. joe17

    joe17 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 25, 2009
    Louisiana
    I waited 24 hours to put the shipped eggs in the bator. I read that you could just not turn the eggs the first day of incubation to make sure the air sacs attach. Can i do this? Will it kill them not turning them the first day?
     
  2. ChickFila

    ChickFila Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 7, 2010
    I always start to turn the eggs, at least 3 times a day from day 1, either shipped eggs or local eggs. Had no problem at all.
     
  3. joe17

    joe17 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 25, 2009
    Louisiana
    I will do this so that the detached air sacs have even more time to attach. How was your hatch rate?? Some of my eggs had detached air sacs though.
     
  4. ChickFila

    ChickFila Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hatch rates were very different by the seller.
    Once, I incubated 40 eggs and 3 hatched. All 40 were shipped eggs and many of them had broken air cells. That was the worst hatch experience, and the only bad hatch.
    Last time, I hatched the largest number eggs, all of them were shipped eggs too, and had almost 100% hatch rate - they were orpingtons and ameraucanas. Many of them had broken air cells too, but they hatched well.
     
  5. joe17

    joe17 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 25, 2009
    Louisiana
    Would it kill them if I didnt turn them the first day???
     
  6. ChickFila

    ChickFila Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 7, 2010
    I don't think so...
    But I always turn the eggs from the first day, and it worked ok.
     
  7. Penturner

    Penturner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 1, 2010
    Reno Nevada
    Rate of hatch is not good at best on eggs with detached air sacs. Rough handling before setting is one of the leading causes of failed embryos in the first 10 days of development. That is just rough handling and not so rough that it breaks air cells. Detached air cells are an indication of extremely rough handling of all the eggs in the shipment. Now having said that I will also say that their is nothing that can be done about. the US mail is handled the way it is and it is not all that tender and loving. even at best boxes are set down roughly. pushed shoved and have other boxes piled on top of them. things fall over and all that. nobody handles a box of eggs like they know it is a box of eggs.

    I always set eggs even with detached air cells simply because there some chance they will develop. but many people will not even waste the space in an incubator on them. I guess if I was ever pressed for room in my bator I would toss a detached air cell over a better egg also.

    I have also read a report from a University that says their is no benefit to turning eggs for the first 10 days. That coupled with the problem of detached air cell this is what I do.

    My incubator is built so that I can place any number of home made turning trays in it that hold various numbers of eggs. anything from 6 to 18 eggs per tray. As an example lets say I order 24 eggs. when they arrive I find that 6 have detached air cells. I will place the 18 good eggs in a tray large enough to hold them and turn them 3 times a day as usual. I have used both pointy end down and on their side methods of holding the eggs and so far have seen better results from eggs on their side. but lots of other factors came into play on those results and it is my opinion that pointy end down or on their side really does not make that much of a difference. Anyway I will then place the 6 bad eggs in a turner that holds 6 eggs pointy end down only. this is so the air bubble stays at the rounded end of the egg. I will not turn these eggs for the first 10 days. I will not touch them their is nothing more I know of that I can do to help them. after 10 days i start turning 3 times a day as usual and either the embryos survive or they do not. My results is that I get many detached air cell eggs to develop to day 10 to 12 and then fail. so far no damaged egg has hatched. I have almost half the battle figured out and will continue to work on the other half. Next time I order eggs through the mail I will not turn ruptured eggs for the first 14 to 16 days and see what happens. I still suspect that at some point the chick is going to be exposed to that air bubble to soon resulting in failure of the embryo.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2010
  8. joe17

    joe17 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 25, 2009
    Louisiana
    thanks so I might not even turn them for the first couple days. i hope none of them die!
     
  9. ChanteclersRock

    ChanteclersRock Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi Joe,

    Here is some advice from a fellow who has been hatching eggs for over fifty years...He says to keep eggs upright and not turn them for six days after they arrive. Then start the turner if you use one. He says that If the air sac can repair, this gives the eggs the best chance. I don't even put them in the incubator the first day or so after they arrive to let them settle. (but they are upright in a clean egg carton) Faith He also advises not to candle until day 14 to give all the eggs a chance to develop. Good Luck!
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2010
  10. ChickFila

    ChickFila Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had many chicks hatched from eggs which had broken air cells. I don't put them "flat" in bator, I just put them in R-com (with auto turner) or in Genesis with auto turner, so air cell can point "up" always.
    Even I hatched goslings from eggs with broken air cells. I bought 4 geese eggs, they were shipped from CA to MD, and 2 of them had broken air cells. Both of them made till lockdown, and one of them hatched and growing well. The other had pip, but couldn't zip.
    So not always broken air cells are impossible to hatch.
     

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