1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Hatchlings do I remove?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by sethsleader, Sep 9, 2009.

  1. sethsleader

    sethsleader Chillin' With My Peeps

    253
    0
    129
    Apr 14, 2009
    Portreath
    I have 3 that hatch yesterday 36 hours ish ago and one this morning, all 4 have fluffed.
    Do I remove them and put them I the brooder or leave them to see if the others pip?

    Its day 21.
     
  2. hinkjc

    hinkjc Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    12,685
    50
    331
    Jan 11, 2007
    PA
    If they just hatched yesterday, they are no where near 36 hours. Actually just around 24 hours. Chicks can stay in the hatcher for up to 72 hours/3 days safely. I would not interfere with the environment and wait to see if others hatch. Typically in a hatch you'll get a few early birds and then the rest hatch. How many eggs do you have left? Did you candle to ensure all were good? These would be determining factors for me on how long to wait before opening it, but my typical rule of thumb is don't open it until the hatch is considered complete.
     
  3. Tuffoldhen

    Tuffoldhen Flock Mistress

    7,505
    19
    301
    Jan 30, 2007
    WV
    I agree wholeheartedly. Patience.
     
  4. sethsleader

    sethsleader Chillin' With My Peeps

    253
    0
    129
    Apr 14, 2009
    Portreath
    Thanks jinkjc, im in uk, first ever hatch29.5 hours worked it out [​IMG]
    13 egg went in the bator, 4 duds which I removed last week, which left 9. 7 looked good when I candled 2 were hard to tell. 4 have hatched so far.

    I think that I can smell something at the vent holes but I think might be the opened shells as 1 has blood on it. [​IMG] Its not an awful smell just a bit wiffy!
     
  5. sethsleader

    sethsleader Chillin' With My Peeps

    253
    0
    129
    Apr 14, 2009
    Portreath
    One chick was pushed into the trough so I had to open yesterday to save it from drowing. Ive rectified that problem chick is fine.
     
  6. iamcuriositycat

    iamcuriositycat Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,703
    43
    228
    Jul 30, 2009
    Charlotte, NC
    Hi sethsleader! My incubator always gets a bit "wiffy" a day or two into the hatch--all those fluids in that warm, humid environment, makes for some interesting "aromas."

    I know it's sacrilege, but I only leave babies in the incubator for 24 hours (ish). That's actually the recommendation from Dave Holderread (Storey's Guide to Raising Ducks), and I do it mostly because by 24 hours old, the ducklings are usually playing with the fan (getting their bills scratched up), poking at the heat element, pooping on the remaining eggs, knocking over the equipment, and generally causing all kind of ruckus in there.

    So at 24 hours, I take out all the ducks that are hatched and fluffed (if one is fluffing, I'll leave them a little longer till it's close to done).

    Then I leave it alone another 24 hours, and repeat until the hatch is done.

    Now, the disclaimer: I've only done two batches of eggs, hatching out a total of 12 eggs at a hatchability rate of around 65%. This is not a stellar hatch rate. However, on this last batch the four eggs that did not hatch all seem to have died before hatch day, and I did not lose even one egg that pipped--all pippers eventually hatched. So, I don't think the humidity at the end was a problem. But obviously, after only two hatches, I'm no expert.

    On the other hand, Holderread certainly *is* an expert, and here is what he does (page 155, Storey's Guide): "On Monday and Tuesday mornings, the hatcher is opened, the trays removed, and the ducklings taken out. The unhatched eggs are returned to the hatcher and lightly sprayed with lukewarm tap water to soften the shell membranes, which may have dried out while out of the machine. On Wednesday morning, the remainder of the hatch is taken off."

    He claims hatch rates of 75-95% of fertilized waterfowl eggs (he doesn't do chickens).
     
  7. hinkjc

    hinkjc Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    12,685
    50
    331
    Jan 11, 2007
    PA
    Just because someone wrote a book doesn't make them an expert. I know nothing of this person, so couldn't say for sure if he's an expert or not. Waterfowl is also different than chickens. What works for one may not work for the other.

    I can say from my own experience and hatching thousands of eggs a year, with consistently 90-100% hatch rates of fertile eggs that opening the bator affects the hatch of chicken, as well as our wild game fowl eggs. I used to open it too. Impatience it tough to get over. And I also only maintained around 75-80% rates at best. Once I stopped opening it, they all would hatch. I have monitored and tracked hatches for years to determine what is best for an optimal outcome. I base my responses on that experience.

    Maransguy posted the chain of events during hatch well, so I'll link his thoughts here. https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=475802#p475802
     
  8. Tuffoldhen

    Tuffoldhen Flock Mistress

    7,505
    19
    301
    Jan 30, 2007
    WV
    Quote:[​IMG] Excellent!
     
  9. iamcuriositycat

    iamcuriositycat Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,703
    43
    228
    Jul 30, 2009
    Charlotte, NC
    Hi hinkjc--I think I must have sounded like I was being critical, and I did not at all mean to be. I just wanted to share my (little) experience and my reading. You sound like you know a lot about chickens and hatching, and I'm glad you're contributing to the thread. Heaven knows, *I'm* no expert.

    I forget that chicken folks may not necessarily know who Dave Holderread is--he's considered by many to be the nation's (and maybe the world's) leading expert on waterfowl breeding, raising, showing, etc. He has run a well-respected hatchery in Oregon since 1961 that is considered the best of the best for obtaining breeding and showing stock.

    Having said all that, you are absolutely right--knowing lots about ducks & geese doesn't make a person an expert on chicken eggs. I defer to the judgment of chicken experts on the board. [​IMG] And I'm sorry if I sounded like I was being critical or confrontational. I didn't mean to be.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. hinkjc

    hinkjc Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    12,685
    50
    331
    Jan 11, 2007
    PA
    No, not at all. Thanks for posting and explaining who he is. That helps. I just want to make sure the OP is getting the best information for their particular situation. All information is helpful and it may be helpful for them to know differing opinions. [​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by