Have a pond

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by sc anderson, Dec 21, 2009.

  1. sc anderson

    sc anderson Out Of The Brooder

    60
    0
    29
    Sep 7, 2009
    Have a small pond about 100' x 100' feed with two springs with small bait fish. I have chicken,s but they are not free range. (#1) If I got ducks would they roost in ther own coop (free range), 100' feet away from the pond where I have my chicken coop's? I have lights in my chicken coops on for a hour after dark do the same for the ducks? (#2) anyone have pictures of there duck coops by there pond? (#3) live in Anderson SC, what kind, just for pets? (#4) well they fly away? (#5) For a new person wanting to learn about duck's where is the best info. Thank you for any help!!!
     
  2. Le Canard de Barbarie

    Le Canard de Barbarie Chillin' With My Peeps

    445
    1
    111
    Jul 19, 2009
    I have a 16' x 16' coop on the edge of a pond. These are meat ducks, and not pets. The area is surrounded by electric poultry netting, with a livestock guardian dog patrolling the interior. There is a break in the fence where the ducks can pass under to get to the four acre pond. The muscovy and mallard ducks can fly, but there is no motivation for them to fly away. I use no lights in the coop as ducks seem to see well in the dark.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

    Barbarie, how's your fence holding up? Mine should be coming next week. Was it as easy to put up as they say it is? Anything in particular you've learned about it that's not at the website?
     
  4. Le Canard de Barbarie

    Le Canard de Barbarie Chillin' With My Peeps

    445
    1
    111
    Jul 19, 2009
    Quote:I have the double spike PermaNet which is four feet high and on 8.33' centers. This fence is awkward to put up with one person, but it is doable. Observations are as follows:

    1) Mucovy ducklings under four weeks of age will go right through it.

    2) A panicked duck can get stuck in the netting and be too stupid to free itself. No deaths with my P5 charger, but one young bird had a burned wing.

    3) The bottom electric wire can slip off the post on to the metal spike, especially at the end posts. This will short out the fence.

    4) Use intermediate posts found at TSC or feed stores to raise or lower the fence on hilly terrain. Plastic tent pegs from Wal*Mart help keep the fence close to the ground on hilly terrain.

    5) The bottom electric wire is prone to shorting out with wet grass, standing water, etc. Test your fence on a regular basis for effectiveness.
     
  5. DuckMamaorBust

    DuckMamaorBust Out Of The Brooder

    83
    0
    29
    Sep 15, 2009
    Westford, MA
    I used to work on a sheep farm and we use to use this type of fencing to subdivide the major fields for rotation purposes. Canard is right, it can be awkward alone but it is doable. We found a way of rolling the fence when taking it down that made it easier to put back up next time. We did have a lamb get stuck in it and die from shock. Our fence was a lot hotter since we deal with coyotes a lot. However, it's a good solution.

    My question is... no issues from hawks with this fence? or, you use this for the older birds so they can't go through it and are therefore less attractive prey to a hawk?
     
  6. lishah2000

    lishah2000 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Just from my limited experience...

    I raised three pekin in a coop and run next to the chickens. Once they got a little size to them, they didn't like going into the coop. I had to carry them in every night. Once they were big enough to go on the pond, they were afraid of it. Couldn't get them to go in. The turtles scared them. They stayed near the chickens.

    I ended up getting three mallards that were a little younger and raised by a duck mom. Those three taught the others to go in the pond and how to watch for hawks and such. After introducing the mallards, they never went back to the coop. They still spend a lot of time around the chickens and go in and out of the open runs, but want nothing to do with the coops or the shelter I made next to the pond.

    I find the pekin to be very friendly. The don't like to be held, but love attention. Great personality. The mallards are friendly enough, they don't come close enough to eat out of your hands, but will follow you around and interact.
     
  7. 1lpoock

    1lpoock Spruce Creek Waterfowl

    Apr 20, 2009
    Sandusky, Ohio
    My duck barn is up on a hill next to my creek. The ducks had a daily routine of eating, walking down to the creek to swim, swim all day, walk back up, eat, and go to bed....i didnt even have to push them up....once they learn, they will follow their routine.
     
  8. Wifezilla

    Wifezilla Positively Ducky

    11,199
    45
    311
    Oct 2, 2008
    Colorado
    They don't like to be held, but love attention

    My Welsh Harlequins are the same way.​
     
  9. 1lpoock

    1lpoock Spruce Creek Waterfowl

    Apr 20, 2009
    Sandusky, Ohio
    Quote:My Welsh Harlequins are the same way.

    Mine are all the same way too....i wish I could hold them, but I think the only duck that enjoys being held is an imprinted lone duck
     
  10. Le Canard de Barbarie

    Le Canard de Barbarie Chillin' With My Peeps

    445
    1
    111
    Jul 19, 2009
    Quote:Yes, I try to keep my hens with ducklings penned up until one or two weeks of age. Ducklings without mothers to control them are kept penned until four weeks of age. My ducks have plenty of cover outside, and the LGD makes it less attractive for the hawks. I'm sure there will be loses to predators, but as long as they remain acceptable then it is of no real concern.

    My neighbors are impressed with how well the dog and fence are working out. Being near the water, my area is a hotbed of predator activity. The beef farmer behind me has wolves worrying his cattle. Coyotes are everywhere.

    Bald eagles, hawks, snapping turtles, owls, etc. all try to live to. My LGD and fence are my deterrent.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2009

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by