1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Have a QUESTION about winter coops.

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Hangin Wit My Peeps, Apr 28, 2008.

  1. Hangin Wit My Peeps

    Hangin Wit My Peeps AutumnBreezeChickens.com

    We are just starting our coop and I was wondering if being in central WI if we should insulate the coop? We are planning on keeping a heat light in there all winter but should we double the plywood and add insulation? Or is it not necessary? Our coop will by 8' X 8'
     
  2. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

    12,521
    78
    341
    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    It gets pretty cold there, so insulation would make life rather easier on your chickens (and make it easier for you to keep the coop sufficiently well vented all winter). So I would vote Yes.

    Pat
     
  3. McGoo

    McGoo Chillin' With My Peeps

    HOnestly, if you insulated the coop, you might find that the heat lamp would be unnecessary. I don't live in as cold a climate, I'm in NY, but our coop, which is extremely well insulated, worked very well all winter (down to 5 degrees) without any heat source. I also put plastic all over the wire mesh in their pen. It kept out a lot of wind.

    I haven't updated my website since winter, but there are a lot of pictures of my dh's handywork if you're interested.

    And good idea to plan ahead.
     
  4. chickflick

    chickflick Overrun With Chickens

    4,476
    100
    291
    Mar 10, 2007
    Dimondale
    I live in Mi and I would definately insulate and double wall your coop! I know people say you don't need to...but our chickens are all spoiled!! You won't have to worry so much about frost bite on their combs and waddles and on their poor little toes! Would help also to have electricity so you can have a heated waterer....that would make life so much easier!! I just have a extension cord from my garage into the coop. Worked out great, but one day soon will run electricty into the coop.
     
  5. Hangin Wit My Peeps

    Hangin Wit My Peeps AutumnBreezeChickens.com

    This has been a great help...this is exactly what we were thinking and I will still keep the heat lamp in there as sometimes it gets down to -25 and down to -45 with wind chill! So I could not see how with living around here you get away with no insulation. THanks everyone for the help and ideas [​IMG] We well have to spend the extra money for some insulation and double walls but at least our chickens will be safe and cozy.
     
  6. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

    12,521
    78
    341
    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    Quote:Wind chill is irrelevant inside your coop [​IMG]

    And you will be surprised, I think, at how much heat chickens put out. They really DO help keep the coop warm. You can always, if necessary, temporarily block off some of the coop so they have a smaller area to keep warm, or hang a canopy of aluminized bubblewrap over their roost to help retain their body heat around them at night.

    Pat
     
  7. Chirpy

    Chirpy Balderdash

    May 24, 2007
    Colorado
    I grew up in Wisconsin (go cheeseheads and Packers!) and now live in Colorado (go Broncos!!).

    I would absolutely insulate your coop. You won't regret insulating it but you probably will if you don't and it's harder to go back and do it later. The issue you will have in Wisconsin is moisture if you don't have proper ventilation. Moisture is your enemy in a chicken coop.
     
  8. Hangin Wit My Peeps

    Hangin Wit My Peeps AutumnBreezeChickens.com

    The issue you will have in Wisconsin is moisture if you don't have proper ventilation.

    So we are planning on drilling some holes in the bottom for ventilation and putting in a vent in the upper point of the roof area. Would this be all we need?​
     
  9. Chirpy

    Chirpy Balderdash

    May 24, 2007
    Colorado
    No, no. You don't want holes in the bottom because of potential drafts.

    Put your vents (have several in different areas, preferably not on the North side) up at the top (make it so you can close them part or all of the way when needed) and have a window or two that can be opened for cross ventilation when needed.

    A window on the south and/or east side will help warm the coop in the winter and not allow so much western hot sun in during the afternoons at summertime.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by