Have to butcher a rooster... but I'm attached to him.

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by torilovessmiles, Mar 17, 2016.

  1. torilovessmiles

    torilovessmiles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Stupid, stupid, stupid me. I have a beautiful gamecock that I named Thomas. I knew he would fight, so for a while now he's been staying in our garage bathroom with a window to see his friends without getting in a fight and killing them. My plan was to breed him with my three largest hens and hatch the chicks to get a decent bird to butcher, that would still free range. This is because he has a lot of breast meat, but is still very small. I thought maybe I could get his muscularity on the larger body frame of my big hens.
    Well, today was nice so I figured while the rest were free ranging, he could stay in the chicken run while it was empty in order to get some fresh air. He picked a fight with our alpha rooster through from inside the run, and hurt himself on the fencing. My mom and I decided that keeping him totally separate from the other roosters would be more trouble than he's worth, and that we would just find a Cornish to fulfill his purpose. He is to be processed tomorrow.

    Of course, I got myself attached to him while I've been raising him. He's so beautiful, his tail feathers are longer than his body and he has a gorgeous purple iridescence on his wings. I just love looking at him... I wish we didn't have to kill him, but its better than selling him and him ending up in some certain unmentionable activities.

    I'm not sure if this was the right place to post this... but any support is appreciated. How do I make myself feel better? [​IMG]
     
  2. beetandsteet

    beetandsteet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have this exact same problem. Hatch my own eggs so always tons of roosters running around. Almost all of my "precious little baby boys" end up being nasty and mean--to everyone else but me. In fact, my favorite rooster, Cooper, is set to die this weekend because he is so volatile.
    It is very hard to give a favorite animal up, even if it's just a rooster. [​IMG]
    In my opinion, animals that were loved by humans on earth will end up in heaven. At least that's what I like to believe :)
     
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  3. torilovessmiles

    torilovessmiles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the support :)
    I need to stop naming them... I always run into this. I have go and name them something adorable. Chip, Fredo, Tommy. One time my sister named her fair pig "Applesauce".

    I think the hard part is that he hasn't shown any human aggression, he's fallen asleep in my mom's arms several times as she held him for me while I was cleaning his bathroom. He just can't see other roosters without hurting himself trying to fight them. If he attacked me, or my family, I think it would be easier to cull him.
     
  4. FakeFarmer1

    FakeFarmer1 Out Of The Brooder

    So get rid of the other roosters then, if you want him so bad.
     
  5. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Sometimes when you have animals you have to make hard decisions. An old dog that is in great pain may be better to be put down than let him go on suffering. A cat or dog that threatens to harm your children can’t be tolerated no matter how long you had them before children. There is nothing pleasant about any of that but it’s a risk of having a pet. You’ve made a pet of that rooster. Much as you say you need to stop doing that, you won’t. It’s just not in your nature.

    I raise mine specifically for meat but I don’t enjoy the killing, even when it is an unpleasant bird. But it’s a necessary part of me having chickens. I don’t name them or make pets out of them. It’s going to be hard on you, but sometimes we have to do what we have to do. If you try to raise chickens specifically for meat you may run into this again.

    I agree it is better for you to eat him instead of him becoming involved in cockfighting. If you try to breed him there is a real good chance his offspring would fight to the death with other roosters, a lot of that is inherited. Since he is small, his offspring will be smaller too. I think you are much better off getting a true Cornish rooster, not a hybrid Cornish Cross, for that purpose.

    As hard as it is, you are making the right decision.
     
  6. torilovessmiles

    torilovessmiles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for you help :)
    All of his offspring would have been terminal.It was kind of going to be an experiment to see how it turned out. I've dealt with killing birds before, I've killed a deer before, squirrels. This one is particularly tough for me, I didn't realize how much I saw him as a pet. I suppose I don't always run into it, but a several times as of lately. I wasn't raised doing this, but I'm hoping after a while my skin will thicken a bit. I know it has to be done. He's not good for my flock and it would be really bad if he got aggressive with me.
    And a new rule, no more naming meat birds or roosters...

    And I meant a true cornish :) Does white or dark make a difference for a meat bird?
    Never tried a cornish cross, I don't think I really want to.
     
  7. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Other than just standard difference in individuals, the only difference in a white or dark is that, if the cross with the white produces light colored birds, you will get a prettier carcass if you pluck. When you pluck pin feathers are left behind. It’s much worse if they are molting but even when they are not molting there can be a lot. The dark feathered birds show these pin feathers much more than a light colored bird. That’s why meat birds are generally white or buff, to give a prettier carcass. I skin mine so it doesn’t matter to me, but it might to you.

    They go through two juvenile molts before they reach adult size. They outgrow their feathers and need to replace them. That doesn’t always happen at the same age but I have butchered some during a juvenile molt. I’m really glad I skin them when that happens.

    I figured you meant real Cornish, not the hybrid but I try to be clear. Some people have raised the hybrids successfully for mating but usually it does not end well. I’d avoid them for mating purposes.
     
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  8. torilovessmiles

    torilovessmiles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the Info! [​IMG]
     
  9. torilovessmiles

    torilovessmiles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The deed is done. It was a lot easier than expected! Sort of messed up processing him so it doesn't look pretty, but whatever :p dressed out 3lbs 12oz. Really lean
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I think you made the right decision so I’ll just say good. I’m glad it was easier than expected.

    To me pretty is not a criteria. A good meal is. How do you plan to cook him?
     

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