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Have to find homes for my dogs

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by newchickowner, Sep 22, 2007.

  1. newchickowner

    newchickowner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2007
    Texas
    I'm not happy at all! My two puppies are just gonna hafta go. They attacked my chickens twice today. No one was killed, thankfully, and no major injuries, but one of my prettiest hens no longer has tail feathers and was really shaken up this morning. I felt terrible! The first attack happened just after sun-up. I don't know how my female dog got out but I assume she jumped the fence to her pen in a weak spot we haven't had the money to fix and started chasing them around. My BF got outside before me and saw that the dog had his favorite hen pinned to the ground against the fence. He ripped the dog off her and threw her back into her pen and helped the hen get untangled and she ran off, looking all beat up.

    When I got out there he was telling me about it and I was able to catch her and feel her all over, no blood, no open wounds of any kind and I felt no broken bones. I let her go back into the coop to recooperate. I watched closely because I've read in other threads that after someone else's hen was attacked but survived the other chickens in their flock picked on the injured bird, but that didn't happen to mine so I let her remain with her friends. She mainly slept all day in the shade, but by this evening I saw her drinking plenty of water and even came over to get some treats I presented them with. [​IMG] I think she's going to be alright.

    Just as I was treating them, I've recently allowed mama hen and my 7 chicks out for a while in the evenings and two of them wandered into the pen with the dogs. They are just small enough to fit through the calf panel on the gate. Not wanting to attract attention for the dogs, I walked over as quickly, but casually as possible and tried to get my six year old to grab their collars (she was playing in the pen with the dogs at the time) but you know how six year olds are, [​IMG] they stand there looking at you saying "huh?" well that was enough hesitation for the dogs to see me and came running over to chase the chicks. Both made it out pretty quickly and without any injury, but I'm shook up because I can't seem to control my dogs instincts I guess. They are only 6 months old, but they aren't working out and I'd rather find them good homes than to find a dead chicken or something. I don't know how bad it's going to get![​IMG]

    Anyone living in my area who knows someone wanting two sweet outside puppies? They are half Great Pyrenees, the other half I think is German Shepard. They are wonderful with my children and my donkey, but they have a chasing need in them. [​IMG] I hate to do it, but I like my chickens more. My BF just wanted to shoot them, there's no way I could let him though. So please, if anyone can help me re-home them I would really appreciate it.

    Here's a picture of the two of them
    [​IMG]

    Here's a pic of the female (Dixie) standing on her hind legs next to my 5 year old. The dog was 4 months old in this pic.
    [​IMG]

    They are soooooo sweet and just want to be loved, but I got them to protect my chickens and other critters and they are just terrorizing them instead. [​IMG]
     
  2. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    Apr 6, 2007
    Iceland
    As I write this reply I am sitting in my barn with my hound, who shakes
    around our chickens because she wants to eat them so bad. I have 12
    chickens, with their coop door open, also running around. Would
    I leave the dog alone in here? No. Would I blame the dog if she grabbed
    one? No.

    Almost any dog can be trained NOT to harm chickens. Read the posts here.
    There are many. You have 2 dogs which create a pack mentality and they
    are young. Their breed also is not one that is good around birds. That's
    3 strikes against you.

    The picture of your BF (whatever BF is) and the dogs show attentive and
    smart dogs. They are both sitting with their heads up. That is a good sign.
    The picture of the one with your daughter also shows a good natured
    dog and a small child who likes him.

    Training is not easy and requires a lot of patience. Contact a local trainer
    if you need the help.

    Another option is to keep the chickens secured when the dogs are out.

    A lot of people in this forum have dogs. Some have them with their chickens,
    some don't, and some only allow supervised visits like me.

    As for your BF shooting them I hope he said this in a joking manner. If
    he would seriously shoot a dog because the dogs are following their
    nature then your right, get rid of the dogs.

    If you would like further suggestions on training please post and I'll make
    more suggestions, as will others.

    Good luck and keep your dogs.

    Don
     
  3. newchickowner

    newchickowner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2007
    Texas
    He wasn't joking, and unfortunately he's not giving me the option to train them, that was the first thing I said to defend the puppies. The problem is that the dogs are never allowed out with the chickens off the leash because they chase them, they have a huge pen with the donkey that they stay in, and the chickens free range in the front acre. Only one other time did they get out and it was an accident that my 6 yr old left the gate open, they immediately went after the chickens. Even though I was outside and hollering at them the female WOULD NOT LISTEN! She's so big and long legged that I just couldn't catch her. The only thing I can think of is getting a shock collar, though I hate them, to give her a mild shock (if possible) when she goes after them. But I don't have the money to buy one. I'm afraid that I won't get them trained to behave before my BF (boyfriend) finds them a home. My plan was to allow them co-exist with the chickens when the front yard is fenced, but off the leash they DO NOT LISTEN. I've trained many, many animals in my lifetime and I've never had such a problem with dogs before. Even the most stubborn ones.

    A friend of mine in FL had an Australian Shepard that would chase and kill her Guinea hens and no matter what they did she wouldn't obey the order to leave them alone, they had to get a shock collar for her which worked most of the time. But there were occasions where they'd be shocking her because she was chasing them and she'd still pursue them as she was being shocked. So I'm not so sure of using that method. I don't really like the idea of it. That's why I think that maybe re-homing them might be better, I'd rather find them a good home that to subject them to such training.
     
  4. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    It sounds like you have your head together on this one. Just keep the faith.
    Remember too that your BF is just that, a BF, NOT A DH. I'm a 37 year old
    pig headed stubborn male so I can say this. My DW would say it too. [​IMG]

    I love the idea of a shock colar. We had one for our hound. It worked great!!!
    I used it to train her to overcome her hunting/running away urge.
    They are not cruel at all. I would shock myself and my friends all the time with
    it.

    DON'T TASE ME BRO!!!!

    One last thought on the two together. When I wrote my last post I only had
    my hound in the barn. Since then I brought in my other dog. With both
    dogs in here they all go nuts, chickens and dogs. It's the pack thing plus
    they get more playfull.

    When you train, train them seperately.

    If you do decide to get rid of them find a home for one of them first. Unless
    you can find a good home for both together, something hard to do with big
    dogs.

    Keep the faith. It sounds to me like you have the brains and experience to make this
    work.

    Don
     
  5. newchickowner

    newchickowner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2007
    Texas
    Thanks! I wasn't sure about the shock collar thing, I just don't have access to one, but I was surely going to shock myself first before putting it on her. I really think that would be all I would need, because they are angels on the leash. And I do only take one out at a time. I just need something to control them when they are off. The male is much lazier and it only takes me growling at him to make him back down. The female on the other hand ignores me. I told my BF that they are young and just need to be discouraged to chase, and with time and age they would end up leaving them alone. [​IMG] They are sooo big that maybe he won't be able to re-home them and that'll give me a chance to try to get a shock collar. I may be able to borrow one from a friend.

    Thanks again!
     
  6. mamaboyd

    mamaboyd Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Kendal.Ontario,Canada
    You could try Craigslists to see if you could get a used shock collar. I am looking for one myself for our dogs. From what I've heard the collars work great, and only causes mild discomfort for the dogs, nothing serious. Hope you can get a hold of one so you don't have to get rid of your lovely dogs![​IMG]
     
  7. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    May 25, 2007
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    Quote:It probably hurts like hell, I think they just process it different than we do. They don't sit around rubbing the area for a half an hour thinking "Holy crap, that really hurt!"
     
  8. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    Apr 6, 2007
    Iceland
    Quote:It probably hurts like hell, I think they just process it different than we do. They don't sit around rubbing the area for a half an hour thinking "Holy crap, that really hurt!"

    You are right. Dogs don't have brains that let them hang on to the shock
    and feel sorry for themselves.

    As for the pain it really doesn't hurt to bad. I set mine on setting 4 out of 10.
    I've shocked myself several times with it. It isn't comfortable but it doesn't really
    hurt. There is no after effect or pain.

    Keep in mind these colars are used on all the invisible fences. The dogs seem ok.
     
  9. mamaboyd

    mamaboyd Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It can't be any worse than the collars you get for underground fencing to train your dogs to stay on your yard. A zap you get if you cross a boundary that you shouldn't. Have you ever touched electric fencing??? It does hurt at first, but would you be willing to touch it again?? Most dogs learn pretty quick, so it wouldn't take long for them to catch on . I have a rotti that has been zapped by the electric fencing going into our horses paddock. He may be as dumb as bricks sometimes, but since he got zapped, he won't go back in with the horses.
    Oops, Purplechicken you beat me to it!
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2007
  10. Happyhenz

    Happyhenz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 15, 2007
    Canberra Australia
    oh no sorry to hear that your puppies are chasing your chooks.
    I have 2 dogs one is an Australian cattle dog and the other is a Bullarab which is an aussie hunting dog.
    Both love to chase the chooks.
    But i have them seperated.
    We only have an average backyard so when the chooks are out the dogs are away and vise versa.
    No matter what anyone says no dog can be COMPLETELY trustworthy with small animals.
    If you want to keep your puppies build a better pen for them and keep them away from your hens.
    Mine dogs are away during the day and out all night and are out on the days that the chooks stay in.
    This method has worked for us and im sure it will work for you.
     

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