Have you ever given a chicken whiskey when they have a cold?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Ol'FashionHen, Dec 15, 2008.

  1. Ol'FashionHen

    Ol'FashionHen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 24, 2008
    The South
    Okay let me sum this up for y'all. My only silkie man (Chester) had his bells rung by my EE guy (Frankie) Thursday. Frankie pulled Chesters top knot feathers out and ran him out of the coop [​IMG]. Poor Chester he was dirty and cold....well needless to say Chester caught a cold. No drainage, no coughing, wheezes every now and then especially when he eats has to open his mouth to breath ever so often when he eats. I have been giving him terrimyicin mixed in his yogurt which I dilute to make runny because he does not want to drink. My DH suggested giving him a few drops of whiskey to help with his cold so yesturday I did about five 'lil' drops... BTW Chester liked it and slept very peacefully. Now the whole time he has been preening, crowing, and eating a 'lil'. This morning he ate like it was gonin' outta style yogurt mixed with terrimyicin and feed, then a few drops of whiskey for the day. Now my question is because I have read in old time remedies of folks even giving their chickens coil oil (kerosene) for colds, so in which I figured I would rather have whiskey than coil oil so I didn't argue that matter with DH. Should I just go ahead and give Chester a shot of what to help him get better sooner or just keep doing what I have been doing. I just don't feel like he is getting enough antibiotics at this point and I don't know what med to give him for a cold in a shot form. I would greatly appreciate some input if anyone has any experience in this situation. sorry so long...
     
  2. the1much

    the1much Currently Birdless Hippy

    i aint got no suggestion bout giving a bird alcahol,,,,,, but that whiskey worked when i gave it to my grams,,, hehehhe,,, she's never drank before,,, she was drunk for hours off 1 shot hahahha [​IMG]
     
  3. Ol'FashionHen

    Ol'FashionHen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jim [​IMG] you are hoot, I had an inkrin' that you may reply to this..
     
  4. Ladyhawke1

    Ladyhawke1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Come Christmas eve I would have no problem sitting around with my peeps sharing a dram or two and toasting….”Here’s to those that wish us well and those that don’t can go to…….. [​IMG] ” Well, that what I would do. [​IMG]
     
  5. Teach97

    Teach97 Bantam Addict

    Nov 12, 2008
    Hooker, OK
    I am feeling a little under the weather...can I come over for some of that nursing?! [​IMG] NOt sure if it is scientific but I like your thinking! [​IMG]
     
  6. Mrs.Puff

    Mrs.Puff Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Southern Iowa
    Hey Laura- Sound like Almanzo's got the right idea. Your Chester will probably just get over his cold on his own. My birds have CRD I think, and they get croupy in the winter, and are all good by spring.
     
  7. Three Cedars Silkies

    Three Cedars Silkies Overrun With Chickens

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    Gainesville, Fl.
    Grains make alcohol when fermented...so you could say you are just giving him fermented grain!! [​IMG]

    I would definitely keep giving him a few drops if he is feeling better and eating and drinking. At least for a few more days until you know he is out of the woods.
     
  8. Ol'FashionHen

    Ol'FashionHen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mrs. Puff:
    Remember I am old fashioned so what is CRD? [​IMG]
     
  9. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    Poor silkie! I have heard many silkie owners recommend they be kept apart from standard size breeds, due to their smaller size, inability to see well, and their meek temperament. Do you have any place to house your silkie roo so he doesn't get beat up again?
     
  10. Three Cedars Silkies

    Three Cedars Silkies Overrun With Chickens

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    Gainesville, Fl.
    Mycoplasmosis (CRD, Air sac, Sinusitis)
    Organisms in the genus Mycoplasma are a significant cause of respiratory disease in poultry. Of the numerous species of Mycoplasma that have been isolated from domestic poultry, three are of known significance. Mycoplasma gallisepticum is associated with chronic respiratory disease (CRD)/air sac syndrome in chickens and turkeys and infectious sinusitis of turkeys; Mycoplasma meleagridis is associated with airsacculitis in turkeys; and Mycoplasma synoviae is the cause of infectious synovitis in chickens and turkeys.
    Chronic respiratory disease (CRD), air sac syndrome and infectious sinusitis of turkeys have a common cause. CRD was first recognized as a chronic but mild respiratory disease of adult chickens. It reduced egg production but caused little or no mortality. Afterward, a condition known as "air sac disease" became a problem in young birds. It caused high mortality in some flocks. Many birds became stunted, feed efficiency was reduced, and many fowl were rejected as unfit for human consumption when processed.

    Infectious sinusitis in turkeys produces a sinus swelling under the eye as well as an inflammation of respiratory organs. It is a chronic disease adversely affecting growth and feed conversion. It may also cause significant mortality in young poults.

    A peculiar bacterial-like organism known as Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is common to all three conditions. CRD and sinusitis in turkeys are caused by a pure MG infections while the air sac syndrome is caused by an infection of MG in combination with E. coli. These conditions are triggered by acute respiratory infections such as Newcastle disease or infectious bronchitis.

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is widespread and affects many species of birds. Eradication programs have reduced the incidence in recent years. It is primarily spread through the egg. Infected hens transmit organisms and the chick or poult is infected when it hatches. Organisms may also be transmitted by direct contact with infected or carrier birds.

    The true CRD produces slight respiratory symptoms such as coughing, sneezing and a nasal discharge. In the air sac syndrome there is an extensive involvement of the entire respiratory system. The air sacs are often cloudy and contain large amounts of exudate. Affected birds become droopy, feed consumption decreases and there is a rapid loss of body weight.

    Infectious sinusitis in turkeys occurs in two forms. When the "upper" form is present, there is only a swelling of the sinus under the eye. In the "lower" form, the lungs and air sacs are involved. The air sacs become cloudy and may contain large amounts of exudate. Both forms of the disease are usually present in the flock and frequently are present in the same bird.

    Diagnosis of either condition must be based on flock history, symptoms and lesions. Blood tests are useful in determining whether a flock is infected.

    The answer to the MG problem in both chickens and turkeys is eradication of the disease organisms. This goal has been achieved in commercial breeding flocks with voluntary programs conducted by the National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP) and National Turkey Improvement Plan (NTIP). The treatment of CRD, air sac syndrome and the lower form of infectious sinusitis is not considered satisfactory. Many antibiotics have been used with varying success. Whether to give treatment is a decision that must be made on each flock based on economic factors. If treatment is attempted, give high levels of one of the broad spectrum antibiotics (Tylosin, aureomycin, terramycin, gallimycin) either in feed, drinking water or by injections. The "upper"; form of infectious sinusitis can be treated with success by injecting antibiotics into the swollen sinus cavity.
     

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