Having trouble with new Silkie hens

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Fundychic, Aug 24, 2010.

  1. Fundychic

    Fundychic Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 13, 2010
    Fundy Shore, NS
    I hind sight, I should never have bought these 2 silkies from this guy... One had a goopy eye - I mentioned this to him, he said he treated it, she will be ok. Antibiotics and lots of nutrition for 2 weeks - Aurora started coming around. 4 weeks now, she is eating and drinking well, however, her eyes are still watery and still gets a little goopy at times, not glued shut like before. What I would like to know, what else could I be doing to clear up the eye problem? Aurora is about 5 months old.

    The other one, Little Brown Betty is about a year old and has an eating disorder. What I have come to realize is that she had never been able to free range. I think she my have been in a cage most of her life. I can't let her run around all day or put her in the run with my other 2 silkies because she over eats and her crop gets impacted and then sours. I have isolated her and only allow her short times free ranging and I watch her food intake. I have been giving her olive oil, yogurt, and garlic. Will she eventually eat normally again and will her digestive system work properly again.

    I didn't want to return these 2 chics back to this guy, because they would just go back to a miserable life.

    Any advise would help.[​IMG]
     
  2. kyrose

    kyrose Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 29, 2009
    Melbourne,Ky.
    awww poor girls.i dont have any advice for ya,just wanted to say bless you for taking them in and taking such good care of them.[​IMG]
     
  3. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    Goopy eyes can be a sign of an underlining respiratory issue. try giving a shot of Tylan injectable for cattle, 1/4cc - 1/2 cc depending on her size. Inject just under skin on the back of neck where meets the back. Do it for 3 days and see how it does. Also can put neosporine in her eyes to prevent it from sticking shut. If it is respiratory, know that they can often spread it and can often be carriers... so be careful exposing them to others. As far as the over eater, I think you are doing what you can, limit her food intake, give her food that is easily digested. i think, like in people it is a disorder and may never totally resolve, but may improve with time.
     
  4. Fundychic

    Fundychic Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 13, 2010
    Fundy Shore, NS
    I'm still dealing with one chicken having impacted crop and then souring the next day. I'm very careful what she eats and not too much. I let her run around but only for about an hour or two. During that time she eats and eats and eats. She is also a very frantic chic, not calm and laid back. She is aggressive towards the other new chicken especially over food.
    Today her crop was so full and soured when I got home. As I was massaging her crop as she was throwing up. I made sure she was hanging downward. She is breathing open beak right now, but it is also very hot outside.

    Has anyone else out there have had a problem with a chicken over eating, impacted crop, etc. I need tips, and will she get back to normal eating? I do believe this is because she has never been a free range chicken, in a cage the 1st year of her life.
    Any advise [​IMG]
     
  5. HorseFeatherz NV

    HorseFeatherz NV Eggink Chickens

    Are you offering her grit - in a dish or bowl by itself - this should be in addition to oyster shell.


    A properly working gizzard needs grit (small, tiny stones) to grind food. Some chickens who have never freeranged and have been fed crumbles their "whole" life, do not have the grit in the gizzard needed to grind the food. This can lead to crop problems.
     
  6. Fundychic

    Fundychic Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 13, 2010
    Fundy Shore, NS
    I have been putting grit into her food everyday, but not oyster shells. I should add oyster shells as well? I have been adding ground up egg shells. I'm also giving her yogurt, olive oil, ground flax and garlic. Its the gorging of food that I find unusual. She never rests or takes a break like the others do.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2010
  7. PamB

    PamB Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 20, 2010
    Dayville, CT
    I wish I had more advice for you but I'm new to chickens. However, I just wanted to tell you how great it is that you have given these chickens a much better life. [​IMG]
     
  8. Fundychic

    Fundychic Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 13, 2010
    Fundy Shore, NS
    I'm fairly new at this to. If I had known better I wouldn't have bought these chics from this guy. Oh, well, live and learn. There is a fall fair coming up and I'm going to look for my reputable breeder there.[​IMG]
     
  9. HorseFeatherz NV

    HorseFeatherz NV Eggink Chickens

    Do not add the grit to her food.

    Give her a large bowl of it - she will pick thru and find the pieces she likes - some are very picky about the size/type of rock/stone.

    Sometimes they need more grit than others - being ground in the gizzard, the grit does get used up. (think of grit like teeth - the gizzard is a round muscle pouch, the muscles contract and use the grit to grind the food which then goes into the intestines) If the gizzard cannot grind - food is not digested.


    A chicken stuffing themselves is not unusual - mine stuff, rest, stuff, rest - all day long.


    Offer oyster shell in its own dish also - as each chicken needs different levels of calcium at different times in their laying cycle.
     
  10. Fundychic

    Fundychic Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 13, 2010
    Fundy Shore, NS
    Thanks for the advise on grit and oyster shells. I will do that. Last few days have been better. I'm letting her run around a bit longer. [​IMG]
     

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