1. BlueDragon Farm

    BlueDragon Farm New Egg

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    Jun 16, 2016
    Hawks have killed all of my chickens and only left with my rooster. They free ranged and we only closed them up at night in their coop. I just purchased 20 pullets and will be building a new coop for them. I HATE to cage them. So I was thinking of building a 12x20 run area and a 8x10 coop with at least 25 feet of roosting space. I love my animals and to keep them caged bothers me. But becoming hawk poo is worse I guess. If I were to keep them caged would this work - or does anyone have any ideas to keep the hawks away. Your help will be greatly appreciated by me and my girls. THANKS!
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    A covered run is the approach most people take.
    I'd also get a different rooster cause he didn't do his job. What breed is he?
    IMHO, he should have fought the hawk or been the first one taken, not the last. Sounds like he was looking after his own skin rather than the flock.
     
  3. dekel18042

    dekel18042 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 18, 2013
    Pennsylvania
    What breed of chickens did you have and what breed did you get? Several years ago we had a flock of hens only, Rhode Island Reds and the hawks were picking them off one at a time. So I did some research and found that certain of the larger breeds were listed as being less targeted by hawks. Among the breeds listed were Jersey Giants, Orpingtons and several other large breeds. So we added Jersey giants and a rooster who would go after anything.
    My husband was in the house, heard screaming and witnessed a hawk attack, Yes the rooster screamed so the hens and juveniles could scramble to safety and he stayed out but the hawk tried to ignore him and went after a small young EE. Thankfully she was able to dive under an evergreen as the dogs and I raced out.
    We had one other attack I witnessed and again, the hawk went after juveniles who again were able to escape.
    We've actually seen hawks come down and sit in trees and telephone posts but not come all the way down so they do target what they go after.
    In that case I had several large roosters out with the flock.
    I have read that Iowa blue roosters are hawk fighters The breed sounds intriguing to me. I might try to pick up a pair or trio.
    I've also had neighbors tell me the hawks target the smaller members of the flock so perhaps that particular hawk was better at avoiding roosters or the larger birds.
     
  4. BlueDragon Farm

    BlueDragon Farm New Egg

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    Jun 16, 2016
    Thank you for responding. The hens were Orpingtons. The rooster I have is a white Leghorn. He is about a year old and maybe he wasn't mature enough to fend the Hawks off or maybe he is to much of a pet. He is a rescue and he follows me around like a little puppy. He is my first rooster so I don't know much about them. The 20 new chicks are Orpingtons too. So are you suggesting another rooster? And if so, is it better to get them full grown?
     
  5. BlueDragon Farm

    BlueDragon Farm New Egg

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    Jun 16, 2016
    My rooster is almost a year old white Leg Horn. He was a rescue and is younger than the hens. He would herd them around the yard. Maybe he is too young or to much like a pet. He follows me all around, runs to me when I call him and is my shadow when I am outside. I do plan on covering the run. Should I get another rooster and how would that work for my Leg Horn. I really appreciate you responding.
     

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