Hawk ?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by flgardengirl, Jun 10, 2011.

  1. flgardengirl

    flgardengirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Can a hawk carry off a full grown LF rooster? One of my Marans roos went missing the other morning about 6am. I was sleeping still but my oldest son said he heard hawks screaming and our guineas going crazy right around 6am. I don't know why he didn't wake me up grrr.
    Anyhow, one of my other huge roos that is always with the missing one had his whole tail feathers pulled out and in a single pile on the ground.

    There were 2 other large roos that always hang out with the others in a pack of 4. The remainding 3 were petrified all day.
    We are on several acres surrounded by woods so there are lots of possiblilities but since my ds heard hawks or some other type of large bird screaming (he is old enough and lived in the country long enough to know that's what it was -so probably was a hawk but we do have eagles here I've but mostly only seen them hunting in the evenings). Anyhow, back to the original question, do you think a hawk could totally carry off a large roo ? Thanks
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2011
  2. Moonkit

    Moonkit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It depends on the rooster.. I think 8 lbs is around the upper limit of what a hawk can successfully take. Although dangerous depending on the resolve of the rooster. Could you estimate the weight of the missing bird? An eagle would have no trouble taking a roo.. but a hungry/desperate hawk can take a toy sized dog (chihuahua, toy poodle, even a small maltese.)
     
  3. flgardengirl

    flgardengirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    He was a real big rooster. At least 8 lbs easy. I never officially wieghed him but he was close to the same size as some of my full grown orpington roosters but probably not quite as fat. The other roos he was with are just as big and the one who had all his tail feathers pulled out was a little bigger.
    Also, could a hawk pull out the other roosters entire tail? It seems like they would just go for the head..?

    I have a standard sized pomeranian (not teacup) that runs around, I'm suprised nothing has got him yet. He is smart enough to run under something when things approach him whereas those roos probably stood there and fought. Darn, I wish I knew what I was dealing with for sure.

    I have found a few holes dug around the runs of some coops lately so I know something is prowling at night but since my son said what he did about the hawk cries and those 4 roos only go out once daylight hits and were staying on the enclosed patio at night until I got some more breeding pens done, I am thinking some type of bird got him.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2011
  4. Jerseycoop

    Jerseycoop Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I hope you find out for sure for closure...and I'm sorry for your loss.
     
  5. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

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    I don't know why, but the first thing that came to mind was fox or coyote. I have a fox hanging around, she got in the pen one night and several tails got pulled. Luckily I heard it and went out. Scared her off, but she's still around.

    So sorry, you have lovely birds. [​IMG]
     
  6. flgardengirl

    flgardengirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you. I am really wondering about that one roo's missing tail now. It seems like something would be chasing him to have pulled it out. I guess a bird could swoop down and accidently grab a tail and try to take off and pull it out. The feathers were in a tight pile on the ground. Not spread out and strewn around. It would have to be a big bird with a good grip. Still seems like a hawk might go for thier heads but I have never actually witnessed a hawk kill so I have no clue lol. I don't know what eagles do. Kill first then carry off? Or just swoop down and grab?
     
  7. Moonkit

    Moonkit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Usually raptors favor an ambush style off attack. Ideally, they want to kill on the first strike since they aren't really equipped like a wolf or big cat for holding and waiting for the prey to bleed out or suffocate. Peregrines will kill birds mid-flight by stooping and slamming into them from above and breaking the back. I've seen redtails take prey on the ground by stooping and slamming into it and going in for a fast bite with that beak of theirs.

    The ambush method of attacking is often why smaller birds (i.e. starlings, grackles, ravens, mocking birds, blue jays, swallow tails, etc) will attack the hawk/eagle on sight and harass it until it leaves. It can't ambush them if they see it first.
     
  8. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Maybe the hawk cries your son heard was when he ate other victims (cats, rabbits, etc.) Maybe the thing that dug holes got ahold of your rooster's tail.
     
  9. pinkwindsong

    pinkwindsong Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 18, 2011
    Laurens SC
    all that was left of my hen was a Puffff of feathers.. no blood no body.. just puff.

    good luck with the hawk
    )O(
    Pink
     
  10. epeloquin

    epeloquin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I have to agree with ranchhand on this one. It sounds to me like you are more than likely dealing with a coyote or fox. This would account for the missing roo because they will actually carry off their prey and it also accounts for the digging. Make sure to bury some chicken wire or hardware cloth or even put an electric fence around.

    Real, real sorry for your loss too. I have six girls and I would be so devastated if we lost one, especially to a predator. This is one reason I am thankful we have a suburban coop. Not too many predators (not that their are none).
     

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