He got me twice!!

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Kimmyk80, Jul 17, 2019.

  1. Kimmyk80

    Kimmyk80 Chirping

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    This is my beautiful, 9 week old blue Andalusian cockerel named Lavvy. Since hatch, Lavvy has been the most lovable little guy- the first to greet you at the gate, the one who talks to you every time he hears your voice. But last night, I went out to the run to snap some pics of my buff brahmas when he came at me and bit my foot. I pushed him away with my foot, but he came back again. He didn’t bite hard, but he had never done that before. Then this evening, I went to shut them in the coop and he came at me again- this time biting my foot and nearly drawing blood. So now I don’t know what to do. I can’t have a flock with a rooster of whom I am afraid, but he is my favorite rooster. I guess my question is, is there a way to change this behavior? I read on another thread that aggressiveness is partly genetic, but can his behavior be curbed before he really hurts someone?
     
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  2. ellenscoop

    ellenscoop Chirping

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  3. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    It's genetic in that it does breed forward and increased hormones accentuate it. But every rooster is an individual. Unfortunately lap boy hell happens to many of us with our favorites. :barnie

    Check out this thread... many people appreciate post #18 and it has a LOT of fantastic tips and clues. These techniques did not work for retraining my handsome "rare" cockerel. But use what you can...
    Rooster Training

    I tolerated until he was over a year old... I'm not afraid of roosters but no one like getting attacked when their back is turned or otherwise. :smack

    To me, it usually progresses... but you may be one of the lucky ones. :fl
     
  4. Kimmyk80

    Kimmyk80 Chirping

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    Thanks for the info! He has always been so willing to be handled, so it was odd for him to decide to come after me. Glad he's not beyond hope:)
     
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  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    Sorry, but that is terrible advise.
    Some of their IG's are good, this one is not.

    Familiarity breeds contempt.

    This is much better advise...
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/aggressive-rooster.1149551/page-2#post-17976693
    Thought it was an article but can't find it.


    Formatted weird... screwed up the quote containers..fixed now.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2019
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  6. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    @aart, I knew I did not say it was hopeless and I provided good info. But according to the response I moved on. :confused:

    I also thought the info from poultry DVM was less than good advice, despite me wanting to value that site.

    Everyone must use their own discernment though... I go with (and speak from) experience and wisdom over hear say. :thumbsup
     
  7. BantyChooks

    BantyChooks Pullarius

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  8. DobieLover

    DobieLover Easily distracted by chickens

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    I'm currently in the process of working with my rooster. He also started with foot pecking as a cockerel. Flogging didn't start until construction on the new coop and run in his territory began then he became a demon boy.
    If you plan to keep this guy and work with him, wear boots and sturdy denim jeans when you walk into the chickens area. You don't actually fear the rooster but the pain he may cause. And do not use your feet to move him away. Chickens fight with their feet. I made the same mistake and I've never seen my rooster go nuttier than when the foot came up. It was fascinating to watch his Ninja warrior moves though :oops:.
    I've been flogged too many times to count and bitten once by my rooster. The only time he hurt me was the bite.
    IMO most people are not willing to work with the more stubborn roosters. It is in the roosters genetic make up to protect his flock. Most people think it is their flock and that is where many issues can arise.
    I also strongly advise reading Shad's article.
    If you have children or anyone else that can be hurt by your cockerel, you may want to rethink keeping him.
    If you want to work with him that is your choice. I don't particularly like the advice in Beekissed article but that may work for some roosters. Not mine.
    A word of encouragement, my boy has been just fine since construction stopped. He watches me like a hawk when I'm working in their pen but I don't fear sneak attacks and he hasn't been aggressive with me at all. But I've changed my behavior around my flock to accommodate him because I want to keep him. I still very much enjoy my birds.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2019
  9. Farmgirl1878

    Farmgirl1878 Songster

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    I agree with the above advice and would only add that my one-year old BLRW roo started chest butting, biting, and making those amazing “ninja moves” a couple of months ago. Hubby suggested that I carry a spray bottle of water around with me and when he charges, spray him. It worked! He only took one time to figure out that he needs to give me my space. I have had to remind him a few times, but now we can even go through the doorway without any drama!
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    I screwed up the quotes, maybe sounded weird.
     

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