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Heat for my hens

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Charlotte Anne, Dec 10, 2013.

  1. Charlotte Anne

    Charlotte Anne Out Of The Brooder

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    Because of what I do with my hens, I still get eggs all winter as well.

    Charlotte
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    I get eggs in winter too but not because of heat. It is mostly age and light related.
    It's been in the low teens and single digits. No heat, big open windows.
    Older birds will take a autumn/winter break, young ones will lay straight through.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. cstronks

    cstronks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Charlotte,

    Heat and supplemental light are not a bad thing for the chickens unless the heat creates moisture and increases humidity inside the coop. Aside from that, light will help them continue to lay. Just be aware of something, however, and I am not saying that this is a good or a bad thing. A chicken can only lay so many eggs in its lifetime, and by putting light in, you are essentially speeding up the production to stay on par with the summer months. What does this mean? Your chickens will stop laying at an earlier age.

    Now, if you only want eggs and plan on culling chickens when they stop, OR if you love them as pets and treat the eggs as an added bonus, then you have nothing to worry about. However, if you want to prolong their laying years, then supplemental light is not going to do that. Hope this info helps you out.

    -Chris
     
  4. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    In Canada I am subject to -40º cold snaps. I do NOT heat my coop. Murphy's law says my birds will find out what -40 is all about when my hydro goes out. Regardless what you decide feed extra Corn over the winter you will not be sorry.

    Or something like this may help also; You could even knit a hoodie for those extra cold days..

    [​IMG]





    As I said I just get cold snaps lasting a few days or so. However climate similar to Saskatchewan Canada where the average daily winter temperature is -22º C lately has made me question my own beliefs.

    I know if I was raising birds in Saskatchewan and I noticed my flock in distress due to cold I would not hesitate to provide them with heat. One has to take a daily inventory on ones birds to gauge their over all health and well being. One has to pay due dilligence when you are responsible for your flock.

    I consider myself somewhat of an expert in my own area. I learned a lot through other peoples mistakes but more through my own. That being said you can not be closed minded to others who are dealing with different challenges.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2013
  5. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake

    I haven't been that cold yet thus year.....mostly single digits to teens with a couple weeks right at freezing........


    But, no heat, no light, no heated water

    My leghorns are still laying almost every single day...
     
  6. Going Quackers

    Going Quackers Overrun With Chickens

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    What are your temps? mine laid last winter, no heat.. we were cold, -30C and worse quite often(and no i am not including a windchill) My ladies are finishing up a molt, so no eggs.. they laid last month though.. should resume soon.

    I do think breed makes a difference too some lay oodles of eggs a year regardless. [​IMG]
     
  7. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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  8. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    I don't dub my roosters and their combs/wattles are ridiculously large. When it's going to stay in the single digits Farenheit or below zero, (-15 C or below) I've started putting them in their own bachelor pad and keeping the temp above 20 F. But still lots of ventilation. It's helped with frostbite. That usually lasts about 2 months or less.

    Climate is critical knowledge. Following directions for winter (or summer for that matter) written in books and magazines for a national or international audience isn't always a good idea.

    Are they rose comb?

    Most people are not as cold hardy as chickens so they worry about them. I think everyone needs to remember that jungle fowl live not only in tropical rainforest but also in the Himalayan foothills so are quite adaptable. And then, many breeds were developed in extremely cold climates. They didn't provide heat either.

    A chicken accustomed to a heated coop will definitely be stressed and possibly die if the power goes out. Even if it doesn't, going from a cozy coop at night to that icy wind in the morning will be stressed as well.
     
  9. Going Quackers

    Going Quackers Overrun With Chickens

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    For sure, i am NOT cold hardy, not my first round with birds, i don't heat the chickens(or the ducks) and i have banty here too.. i say the same about heat lamps... they have many caveats.(hydro outage, getting birds used to non natural temps, fire hazard and so forth)

    I always stress getting birds for climate. [​IMG] and within that laying amounts vary too.
     
    1 person likes this.

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