Heat for youngsters

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by 2goose, Aug 10, 2011.

  1. 2goose

    2goose Out Of The Brooder

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    May 23, 2011
    My chicks are due to arrive soon, so I am scrummaging around to fix up a brooder. For heat I am thinking I might be able to use the heater from my dog house. It is a flat pad encased in hard plastic with an armoured cord. Temp. is constant at 110 F. Put it in the brooder under the shavings.

    What do you think?

    Bob
     
  2. maybejoey

    maybejoey got chickenidous?

    That sounds okay. I use a heat lamp though.[​IMG]
     
  3. poseygrace

    poseygrace Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 29, 2011
    Georgia
    I'd go with a heat lamp, it will be more adjustable so you can move it up/down if they get hot/cold and as they grow. They are very inexpensive, I got mine for about $5 at TSC. It's just a metal lamp with a clip, and if you use a red bulb it will cut down on them picking on each other.
     
  4. ScottyHOMEy

    ScottyHOMEy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 21, 2011
    Waldo County, Maine
    Quote:If the pad is large enough to cover most of your brooder, it's not your solution, unless it has a thermostat on it that allows you to control the tepmperature. Even that will not be ideal, especialy if you have chicks of different breeeds or sexes coming. If it covers most of the brooder area, there is limited (or no) space for those chick that need less heat than the others to get away from it.

    It might be okay for the first few days while you evaluate the advice here for the alternative that will work best in your setup.

    The advantage of a light (placed centrally or at one end) is that it provides more heat at its focal point(s). Properly adjusted the chicks will settle in loosely but generally under it at the beginning. When they start to snooze in more of a circle away from that focus -- that's your sign that it's time to move the light up to generally reduce the temperature to where they again can stay warm without piling onto each other. And so on until, after several adjustments, they won't need the light at all for warmth.

    The drawback of a large mat of a single temperature is that those that mature/feather out faster won't have a choice of a cooler, more comfortable (read "healthier") spot.
     

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