Heat lamp

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Rookiechookie, Feb 26, 2016.

  1. Rookiechookie

    Rookiechookie Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 25, 2016
    I have a box that is 1.1 metres 3.6 foot wide and 1.8 metres 6 foot long ready for chicks there's just one piece to the puzzle missing the heat lamp does anyone know what wattage I should use
    P.s I always have a thick blanket on the top to keep the air in [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  2. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps

    Remove the blanket, it poses a fire hazard with the heat lamp and prevents proper ventilation and air flow, put a 250W heat lamp in the appropriate rated light reflector and mount it on something that will allow you to move it up and down locate it on one side of the brooder so the chicks can go to the other side if they want cooler temps...

    Put a thermometer directly under it and adjust height until directly under the light centered is 100°-105°F initially... Then monitor the chicks actions with the temp under the light 100°-105° the chicks should gather around the heated area but likely not directly under it, slowly move the light upwards over the next few weeks reducing the temp about 5°F per week...
     
  3. RitzHomestead

    RitzHomestead Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is the basic setup of my brooder, they are in our basement and if you get a light like this with a warming light there is no need for a blanket to go over it. I have my red light kind of directed towards one corner so the main heat is there and they are able to get away from the heat if they want. A hint if you have the heat right or wrong, the chicks will tell you. If the lamp is too close they will be in a corner as far away from the heat as possible often with their wings fanned out to vent. If it is too far away they will be huddled right under it and not moving as much. If it is perfect they will be just outside the main focus of the warming light. I always keep their food and water out of the light so it doesn't get too hot. Just watch your chicks they will be the best ways to tell if something isnt right. Last year I built a big heavy brooder, and this year I went simple and will add another box to this one when they start to grow.




    [​IMG]
     
  4. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    As PP stated, loose the blanket. You'll need something over the top to keep the chicks from flying out (plan on that by the time they are 2 weeks old) You need just as few watts as necessary to provide a small area directly under the lamp that is about 85 - 90*. (you'll want the lamp about 18" above the bedding and secured very well by more than one attachment. The remainder of the box should be at least 10 - 20* cooler. Many folks keep chicks too warm. Initially, when they are getting over shipping stress, they may need 90 - 95*, but by the next day or so, they should do fine with the temp dropped down to 85 - 90* .

    Now, I'm going to suggest that you consider an other option. Many of us are finding that a heating pad more closely mimics the heat provided by a broody hen. It's also a lot safer than the intense heat of a heat lamp. Here's an article that might peak your interest: https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/yes-you-certainly-can-brood-chicks-outdoors
     
  5. Rookiechookie

    Rookiechookie Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 25, 2016
    Thanks for your help[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  6. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Let It Snow Premium Member

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    I like to use a 125 watt bulb. It's not as hot and works just as well as long as the brooder room isn't too cold. I haven't had trouble using a white light, more troubles are caused by heat, crowding and boredom. Good air circulation is needed to so don't cover them. Set you initial temperature than use their behavior as your guide. Happy chicks are spread out and cheep softly.
     
  7. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    The reason I suggested 250W is due to the mere size of his brooder... Depending on brooder size I have used anywhere from 60W to 250W whatever it takes to make that give or take 100°F hot spot in the brooder when they hatch, you can of course use a lower wattage but you want to make sure the light is high enough that they can't contact it and get burned...
     
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  8. ejcrist

    ejcrist Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Definitely remove the blanket as others have said due to the hazard. The 250w is good for starters but I cut back to a 125 after about 2 weeks since it's not very cold where I live even in winter. After about 2 more weeks I dropped back to a 100w reptile bulb and finished out with that.
     
  9. Rookiechookie

    Rookiechookie Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the help because my set up was a 150w heat lamp at one end and a 50w heat lamp at the other end

    Could you still keep the blanket on but leave the two ends where the heat lamp is uncovered so there is ventilation and the rug isn't near the heat lamp therefore it might not be a fire hazard????
     
  10. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Let It Snow Premium Member

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    You shouldn't need a blanket. I put a screen over the top of mine, and if needed a few boards to make the opening on top smaller initially. They do need good air exchange though so don't cover too much.
     

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