Heat Lamps? And chicken compatibilty?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by EElover99, Mar 22, 2013.

  1. EElover99

    EElover99 New Egg

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    Mar 22, 2013
    Hi guys i am new to raising chickens and got 4 EEs and 4 Rhode island reds 3 days ago on March 18th and i have a few questions!

    1) How long do the have to stay under the heat lamp? And how do i know if they are getting to hot?

    2) on April 15th i am getting Silver Spangled hamburs 2 of them. on may 6th i am getting 4 golden wyandotte and 2 lakenvelders. On may 13th i am getting 2 barred rocks and on June 17th 2 speckled sussex. Will i have to get new heat lamps and different boxes for all age the different age groups?

    3) What age should the temperature change for the chicks?

    4) When do they get almost all of their feathers [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2013
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    First, have a large enough brooder. This allows the birds to come and go, under the lamp, as they regulate their own body temperature. If you bought the typical 250 watt bulb, these really pump out the heat and spin your meter.

    If you over cook them, they'll stand and pant with their wings held out. Dangerous. If they are cold, they'll pile up and peep loudly. Let their body language tell you what is going on.

    After a few weeks, it is easier to swap out that bulb for something of lower wattage, say around 100 watts. They'll be pretty feathered out at 6-7 weeks, and with spring coming on in North America, by then, they'll not need anything supplemental.

    BTW, that is a large age difference in your two groups. I highly suggest separate brooders.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2013
  3. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    If that is the picture of your brooder in your avatar, you should recognize that they are going to outgrow that in a flash. Just sayin'. Having small batches of different chicks arrive over a three month period will make life very interesting for you. LOL.
     
  4. EElover99

    EElover99 New Egg

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    Mar 22, 2013
    How do you suggest i seperate them? can one week go with 1 day? Or should every time i buy new chicks get a new brooder?

    I know i have something bigger. and i am up to any challenge [​IMG] .
     
  5. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    We have found that 9-10 days in age difference is the outside window. So, you'll have to just walk through this as it occurs. Bantam birds are smaller, of course, so having them be the younger isn't likely the matchup you're looking for.

    When you spread out your brooding over a 3 or 4 month period, it does create challenges, but feeders can be shoe box lids and once the chicks are three weeks old, they can use a one gallon waterer just fine. Passing down desk lamps, shielded lamps and bulbs in differing wattages, is sort of a chess game and actually makes for fun, if you allow yourself permission. Chickens have been raised for 4000 years domestically, in every scenario imaginable. Don't get all hung up on the strict rules that this or that "poultry book" expert insists is the ONLY way. There's hardly ever an ONLY way. LOL

    It is this imagination and creativity that can save you money. No sense buying alot of equipment for a very short term use. Boxes are free. Even big appliance boxes or water mellon boxes are also huge. Using the box of a utility trailer has always worked for me. Part of this is the creative aspect. Enjoy the journey.
     

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