Heat lamps...

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Chicks Galore3, Oct 29, 2013.

  1. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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    I know heat lamps can be a heated (no pun intended...) topic. Some people think they are the best thing since sliced bread and some think they are nasty, vile, creatures. Everyone is entitled to their opinion. I am trying to form my opinion on heat lamps, so I would like to hear when/why people hang up heat lamps without people bashing people and putting them down because their opinions differ. I, personally, last year, turned it on every time it got below freezing. My chickens hardly went out last year because they didn't like being blasted with cold air after a warm, cozy coop. There were several times when I almost lost some chickens because they were so used to the warmth and I either forgot to turn the lamp on or the electricity went out. So, this year, I haven't turned them on at all, and it's gotten into the low twenties. My chickens are doing GREAT, even better then last year, and haven't shown many signs of "I'M COLD!" even though technically, they are colder now then they were last year. So I am trying to NOT use the heat lamp as much as possible. Now, (To finally get to my question) I am wondering if there is a point when taking the risk of a power outage is just as great as not providing heat, because say, it's -20. Clear as mud?
     
  2. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    I only provide heat for chicks. 40 + years of keeping chickens has convinced me that chickens will do just fine even in weather down to minus 20 degrees.

    And there are plenty of people on this site that keep chickens in colder places than where I have lived that will agree with me.

    :) your chickens will be just fine :)
     
  3. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    I live in MN. I do not use heat lamps for my chickens, for the reasons you stated. They don't get acclimated to the cold if you provide artificial heat. If you're heating them and your electricity goes out, then where are they? My chickens have done just fine in the cold, and our weather here is comparable to yours. . Just keep them in a well-ventilated, draft-free coop. I've read that plenty of bedding helps. I keep a deep layer of straw in my coops. I use heated dog dishes for water so it doesn't freeze up. They'll be just fine.
     
  4. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: It all made perfect sense, and goes to prove the best thing to do to help birds is to RESIST the urge to "help"
     
  5. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Folks here raise birds in Alaska without supplemental heat. Animals are designed to withstand the cold, or they all would have died off [​IMG] Most of us have wild birds in our areas in the winter and those little guys do just fine.
     
  6. 4 the Birds

    4 the Birds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It is kinda ironic that you mention that you are "trying to from your opinion on heat lamps" when you mention how you almost lost chickens last year when you forgot to turn on your heat lamp or lost electricity. Hmmmm..

    Either don't heat or put your lamps on a timer. A generator is a common item here on our farm and a great thing to have even for the suburban home. We run a brooder lamp during the Winter for the egg production. It does not provide much heat but it serves a purpose.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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    Yeah, I guess I just formed my opinion there, huh? I do have lights on a timer for egg production, which does add a little heat, as does the body heat of the chickens and I am using the deep litter method, which also provides a little heat. Thank you everybody for the reassurances. :)
     
  8. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Go out some night when the birds are roosting and stick your hand up under their belly, try to get a finger really against the skin instead of just on the feathers. First, it's hard to do, as they're so fluffed out. Second, their skin is pretty darn toasty! They generate a good amount of heat, sometimes I'm surprised I don't see steam coming off them.
     
  9. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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  10. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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    I have another question. It doesn't involve heat lamps but it does involve heat. (or lack there of.) It is very drizzly rainy foggy yucky outside, and it's about 50 degrees. Should I let my chickens out? If (they will) get wet, would they be too cold? One time last year they got wet and it was cold so I blow-dried them, because I didn't know if they'd catch their deaths of colds.
     

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